skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Final Scientific/Technical Report

Abstract

A variety of calcifying organisms produce a transient or metastable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase that is assembled and subsequently transformed into a crystalline biomineral, typically calcite or aragonite. The complex shapes, hierarchical structures, and unique physical properties of the biominerals that result from this calcification pathway have stimulated interest in adapting these concepts for the design and creation of bio-inspired functional materials in the laboratory. ACC also forms as a reactive precursor in diverse inorganic systems and is likely to play a much broader role in calcium carbonate formation. Knowledge of the structure, composition, and behavior of this metastable phase is critical for establishing a structural and mechanistic framework for calcium carbonate formation and its role in biogeochemical processes, including carbon cycling. Minor additives, such as magnesium, phosphorus, and organic macromolecules, are known to play important roles in controlling ACC stability, transformation kinetics, and selection of final crystalline polymorph. Molecular water also occurs in many types of ACC and is thought to play a structural role in its stability and transformation behavior. One of the major challenges that remain unresolved is identification of the structural basis for the role of these minor additives and molecular water. The absencemore » of long-range order in ACC, and other amorphous phases, has posed a challenge for study by techniques commonly used for crystalline solids. Preliminary studies in our group show that the combination of two techniques, synchrotron X-ray-based pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide entirely new insight to structural properties of synthetic ACC over length scales that are most relevant for understanding its transformation properties. Building on preliminary experiments, we propose a systematic study of synthesis, structure, and transformation behavior in abiotic systems. The work will specifically address the influence of phosphate as a minor additive. PDF analysis will utilize total X-ray scattering data collected at synchrotron facilities optimized for this method and will provide direct characterization of the short- and intermediate-range structure of ACC synthesized under controlled conditions. Parallel computational work using reverse Monte Carlo methods will allow structural models to be constructed for a more complete analysis of PDF results. NMR spectroscopy, using a variety of single- and double-resonance techniques, will provide information on H and CO3 components, including dynamical properties, and their relationship to stabilizing additives. PDF and NMR results will be complemented by parallel studies using X-ray absorption and FT-IR spectroscopy to allow direct comparison to previous studies. These techniques will be used to follow the transformation of different ACC samples, with specific additives, to crystalline phases under controlled condition (e.g., relative humidity). This work will provide the structural and mechanistic basis for understanding ACC stability, its transformation behavior, and the factors that govern polymorph selection. This new insight will directly benefit researchers in diverse fields, as well as adding to the framework of knowledge for understanding and controlling calcium carbonate formation in natural and engineered systems.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1400023
Report Number(s):
DOE-SBU-0000796
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0000796
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Reeder, Richard, and Phillips, Brian. Final Scientific/Technical Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1400023.
Reeder, Richard, & Phillips, Brian. Final Scientific/Technical Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1400023.
Reeder, Richard, and Phillips, Brian. Wed . "Final Scientific/Technical Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1400023. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1400023.
@article{osti_1400023,
title = {Final Scientific/Technical Report},
author = {Reeder, Richard and Phillips, Brian},
abstractNote = {A variety of calcifying organisms produce a transient or metastable amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase that is assembled and subsequently transformed into a crystalline biomineral, typically calcite or aragonite. The complex shapes, hierarchical structures, and unique physical properties of the biominerals that result from this calcification pathway have stimulated interest in adapting these concepts for the design and creation of bio-inspired functional materials in the laboratory. ACC also forms as a reactive precursor in diverse inorganic systems and is likely to play a much broader role in calcium carbonate formation. Knowledge of the structure, composition, and behavior of this metastable phase is critical for establishing a structural and mechanistic framework for calcium carbonate formation and its role in biogeochemical processes, including carbon cycling. Minor additives, such as magnesium, phosphorus, and organic macromolecules, are known to play important roles in controlling ACC stability, transformation kinetics, and selection of final crystalline polymorph. Molecular water also occurs in many types of ACC and is thought to play a structural role in its stability and transformation behavior. One of the major challenges that remain unresolved is identification of the structural basis for the role of these minor additives and molecular water. The absence of long-range order in ACC, and other amorphous phases, has posed a challenge for study by techniques commonly used for crystalline solids. Preliminary studies in our group show that the combination of two techniques, synchrotron X-ray-based pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can provide entirely new insight to structural properties of synthetic ACC over length scales that are most relevant for understanding its transformation properties. Building on preliminary experiments, we propose a systematic study of synthesis, structure, and transformation behavior in abiotic systems. The work will specifically address the influence of phosphate as a minor additive. PDF analysis will utilize total X-ray scattering data collected at synchrotron facilities optimized for this method and will provide direct characterization of the short- and intermediate-range structure of ACC synthesized under controlled conditions. Parallel computational work using reverse Monte Carlo methods will allow structural models to be constructed for a more complete analysis of PDF results. NMR spectroscopy, using a variety of single- and double-resonance techniques, will provide information on H and CO3 components, including dynamical properties, and their relationship to stabilizing additives. PDF and NMR results will be complemented by parallel studies using X-ray absorption and FT-IR spectroscopy to allow direct comparison to previous studies. These techniques will be used to follow the transformation of different ACC samples, with specific additives, to crystalline phases under controlled condition (e.g., relative humidity). This work will provide the structural and mechanistic basis for understanding ACC stability, its transformation behavior, and the factors that govern polymorph selection. This new insight will directly benefit researchers in diverse fields, as well as adding to the framework of knowledge for understanding and controlling calcium carbonate formation in natural and engineered systems.},
doi = {10.2172/1400023},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Oct 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Oct 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: