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Title: Developing 3D morphologies for simulating building energy demand in urban microclimates

Abstract

In order to simulate the effect of interactions between urban morphology and microclimate on demand for heating and cooling in buildings, we utilize source elevation data to create 3D building geometries at the neighborhood and city scale. Additionally, we use urban morphology concepts to design virtual morphologies for simulation scenarios in an undeveloped land parcel. Using these morphologies, we compute building-energy parameters such as the density for each surface and the frontal area index for each of the buildings to be able to effectively model the microclimate for the urban area.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1399985
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2017/354
75840
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

New, Joshua Ryan, Omitaomu, Olufemi A., Allen, Melissa R., Yuan, Jiangye, Seals, Matthew B., and Carvalhaes, Thomaz M. Developing 3D morphologies for simulating building energy demand in urban microclimates. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1399985.
New, Joshua Ryan, Omitaomu, Olufemi A., Allen, Melissa R., Yuan, Jiangye, Seals, Matthew B., & Carvalhaes, Thomaz M. Developing 3D morphologies for simulating building energy demand in urban microclimates. United States. doi:10.2172/1399985.
New, Joshua Ryan, Omitaomu, Olufemi A., Allen, Melissa R., Yuan, Jiangye, Seals, Matthew B., and Carvalhaes, Thomaz M. 2017. "Developing 3D morphologies for simulating building energy demand in urban microclimates". United States. doi:10.2172/1399985. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1399985.
@article{osti_1399985,
title = {Developing 3D morphologies for simulating building energy demand in urban microclimates},
author = {New, Joshua Ryan and Omitaomu, Olufemi A. and Allen, Melissa R. and Yuan, Jiangye and Seals, Matthew B. and Carvalhaes, Thomaz M.},
abstractNote = {In order to simulate the effect of interactions between urban morphology and microclimate on demand for heating and cooling in buildings, we utilize source elevation data to create 3D building geometries at the neighborhood and city scale. Additionally, we use urban morphology concepts to design virtual morphologies for simulation scenarios in an undeveloped land parcel. Using these morphologies, we compute building-energy parameters such as the density for each surface and the frontal area index for each of the buildings to be able to effectively model the microclimate for the urban area.},
doi = {10.2172/1399985},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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