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Title: Biofuel production from Jerusalem artichoke tuber inulins: a review

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1399951
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biofuel Research Journal; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Bhagia, Samarthya, Akinosho, Hannah, Ferreira, Jorge F. S., and Ragauskas, Arthur J. Biofuel production from Jerusalem artichoke tuber inulins: a review. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.18331/BRJ2017.4.2.4.
Bhagia, Samarthya, Akinosho, Hannah, Ferreira, Jorge F. S., & Ragauskas, Arthur J. Biofuel production from Jerusalem artichoke tuber inulins: a review. United States. doi:10.18331/BRJ2017.4.2.4.
Bhagia, Samarthya, Akinosho, Hannah, Ferreira, Jorge F. S., and Ragauskas, Arthur J. 2017. "Biofuel production from Jerusalem artichoke tuber inulins: a review". United States. doi:10.18331/BRJ2017.4.2.4.
@article{osti_1399951,
title = {Biofuel production from Jerusalem artichoke tuber inulins: a review},
author = {Bhagia, Samarthya and Akinosho, Hannah and Ferreira, Jorge F. S. and Ragauskas, Arthur J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.18331/BRJ2017.4.2.4},
journal = {Biofuel Research Journal},
number = 2,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}
  • Jerusalem artichoke (JA) has a high productivity of tubers that are rich in inulins, a fructan polymer. These inulins can be easily broken down into fructose and glucose for conversion into ethanol by fermentation. This paper discusses tuber and inulin yields, effect of cultivar and environment on tuber productivity, and approaches to fermentation for ethanol production. Consolidated bioprocessing with Kluyveromyces marxianus has been the most popular approach for fermentation into ethanol. Apart from ethanol, fructose can be dehydrated into into 5-hydrolxymethylfurfural followed by catalytic conversion into hydrocarbons. Finally, findings from several studies indicate that this plant from tubers alone canmore » produce ethanol at yields that rival corn and sugarcane ethanol. JA has tremendous potential for use as a bioenergy feedstock.« less
  • Processing and fermentation of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tuber pulp mashes were successfully carried out at pilot scales of 60 gallons and 1000 gallons. Whole tubers were pulped mechanically into a thick mash and fermented, using commercially available Saccharomyces cerevisiae and selected strains of Kluyveromyces fragilis. EtOH fermentation yields ranging from 50-70% of theoretical maximum were obtained in 3-4 days. Several problems regarding the processing and direct fermentation of tuber pulp mashes are discussed.
  • The inulin-type sugars present in the stalks of Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) were extracted with hot water and were used as a substrate to produce fuel EtOH. Seven different yeasts were used to obtain batch kinetic data. The medium consisted of stalk extract from Jerusalem artichoke containing 7.3% total sugars, supplemented with 0.01% oleic acid, 0.01% corn steep liquor, and 0.05% Tween 80. All batch fermentations were carried out in a 1-L bioreactor at 35 degrees and pH 4.6, and the following parameters were measured as a function of time: total sugars, EtOH and biomass concentration, maximum specific growth rate,more » and biomass and EtOH yields. The best EtOH producer was Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 which gave an EtOH-to-sugar yield 97% of the theoretical maximum value, with almost 100% sugar utilization.« less
  • This article examines the potential of Jerusalem artichoke as a source for ethanol and single-cell protein SCP. In addition, experimental results are presented on batch fermentation kinetics employing two strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus and one strain of Saccharomyces rosei grown on the extract derived from the tubers of Jerusalem artichoke. Of the three cultures examined, Kluyveromyces marxianus UCD (FST) 55-82 was found to be the best producer of ethanol grown in a simple medium at 35 degrees C. The ethanol production was found to be growth-associated having a mu max = 0.41/h and the ethanol and biomass yields were determinedmore » to be Y p/s = 0.45 (88% of the theoretical) and Y x/s = 0.04 with 92% of the original sugars utilized. On the basis of carbohydrate yields of Jerusalem artichoke reported in the literature and these batch kinetic studies with Kluyveromyces marxianus, the calculated ethanol yields were found to range from 1400 kg ethanol/acre/yr to a maximum of 2700 kg ethanol/acre/yr. The SCP yields for Kluyveromyces marxianus were calculated to range between 130 to 250 kg dry wt cell/acre/yr. The potential for developing an integrated process to produce ethanol and SCP is also discussed. (Refs. 27).« less