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Title: Has pellet production affected SE US forests?

Abstract

Wood pellet export volumes from the Southeastern United States (SE US) to Europe have been growing since 2009, leading to concerns about potential environmental effects. Biomass pellets are intended to reduce carbon emissions and slow global warming by replacing coal in European power plants. Yet, stakeholders on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean worry that increased pellet production might lead to changes in SE US forests that harm water and soil quality, or endanger sensitive species—such as birds, tortoises, and snakes—and their habitats. Stakeholders have also expressed concern that increasing pellet demand might accelerate a fifty-year trend in which naturally regenerating mixed hardwood and pine forests native to the SE US are being replaced by plantation pine forests.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1399931
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
World Biomass
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2017/2018; Journal ID: ISSN 9999-0010
Publisher:
DCM Productions
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Dale, Virginia H., Kline, Keith L., and Parish, Esther S. Has pellet production affected SE US forests?. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Dale, Virginia H., Kline, Keith L., & Parish, Esther S. Has pellet production affected SE US forests?. United States.
Dale, Virginia H., Kline, Keith L., and Parish, Esther S. Sun . "Has pellet production affected SE US forests?". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1399931.
@article{osti_1399931,
title = {Has pellet production affected SE US forests?},
author = {Dale, Virginia H. and Kline, Keith L. and Parish, Esther S.},
abstractNote = {Wood pellet export volumes from the Southeastern United States (SE US) to Europe have been growing since 2009, leading to concerns about potential environmental effects. Biomass pellets are intended to reduce carbon emissions and slow global warming by replacing coal in European power plants. Yet, stakeholders on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean worry that increased pellet production might lead to changes in SE US forests that harm water and soil quality, or endanger sensitive species—such as birds, tortoises, and snakes—and their habitats. Stakeholders have also expressed concern that increasing pellet demand might accelerate a fifty-year trend in which naturally regenerating mixed hardwood and pine forests native to the SE US are being replaced by plantation pine forests.},
doi = {},
journal = {World Biomass},
number = ,
volume = 2017/2018,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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