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Title: David Weston – DOE Early Career Research Program Award Winner

Abstract

Plant biologist David Weston is one of this year's U.S. Department of Energy Early Career Research Program award recipients. With this award, he will identify the genes and metabolic functions involved in the exchange of nutrients between certain plants and microbes and study their response to environmental changes in both laboratory and field settings. Deeper fundamental understanding of the symbiotic plant-microbe relationship could reveal pathways to improve bioenergy crop production in nutrient-limiting environments.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
ORNL (Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1399913
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; PLANT BIOLOGIST; RESEARCH; DAVID WESTON; AWARD; CAREER

Citation Formats

Weston, David. David Weston – DOE Early Career Research Program Award Winner. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Weston, David. David Weston – DOE Early Career Research Program Award Winner. United States.
Weston, David. Wed . "David Weston – DOE Early Career Research Program Award Winner". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1399913.
@article{osti_1399913,
title = {David Weston – DOE Early Career Research Program Award Winner},
author = {Weston, David},
abstractNote = {Plant biologist David Weston is one of this year's U.S. Department of Energy Early Career Research Program award recipients. With this award, he will identify the genes and metabolic functions involved in the exchange of nutrients between certain plants and microbes and study their response to environmental changes in both laboratory and field settings. Deeper fundamental understanding of the symbiotic plant-microbe relationship could reveal pathways to improve bioenergy crop production in nutrient-limiting environments.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Oct 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Oct 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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