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Title: Name that tune: Mitigation of driver fatigue via a song naming game

Abstract

Fatigued driving contributes to a substantial number of motor vehicle accidents each year. Music listening is often employed as a countermeasure during driving in order to mitigate the effects of fatigue. And though music listening has been established as a distractor in the sense that it increases cognitive load during driving, it is possible that increased cognitive load is desirable under particular circumstances. For instance, during situations that typically result in cognitive underload, such as driving in a low-traffic monotonous stretch of highway, it may be beneficial for cognitive load to increase, thereby necessitating allocation of greater cognitive resources to the task of driving and attenuating fatigue. Here, we employed a song-naming game as a countermeasure to fatigued driving in a simulated monotonous environment. During the first driving session, we established that driving performance deteriorates in the absence of an intervention following 30 min of simulated driving. During the second session, we found that a song-naming game employed at the point of fatigue onset was an effective countermeasure, as reflected by simulated driving performance that met or exceeded fresh driving behavior and was significantly better relative to fatigued performance during the first driving session.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Psychology
  2. Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Psychology
  3. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); US Department of the Navy, Office of Naval Research (ONR)
OSTI Identifier:
1399889
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-10834J; SAND-2017-11426J
Journal ID: ISSN 0001-4575; 648643
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; NA0003525; N0001411IP20023; N0001410IP20028
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Accident Analysis and Prevention
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 108; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0001-4575
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING; driving; fatigue; music; countermeasure; attention; distraction

Citation Formats

Trumbo, Michael C., Jones, Aaron P., Robinson, Charles S. H., Cole, Kerstan, and Morrow, James D. Name that tune: Mitigation of driver fatigue via a song naming game. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.aap.2017.09.002.
Trumbo, Michael C., Jones, Aaron P., Robinson, Charles S. H., Cole, Kerstan, & Morrow, James D. Name that tune: Mitigation of driver fatigue via a song naming game. United States. doi:10.1016/j.aap.2017.09.002.
Trumbo, Michael C., Jones, Aaron P., Robinson, Charles S. H., Cole, Kerstan, and Morrow, James D. 2017. "Name that tune: Mitigation of driver fatigue via a song naming game". United States. doi:10.1016/j.aap.2017.09.002.
@article{osti_1399889,
title = {Name that tune: Mitigation of driver fatigue via a song naming game},
author = {Trumbo, Michael C. and Jones, Aaron P. and Robinson, Charles S. H. and Cole, Kerstan and Morrow, James D.},
abstractNote = {Fatigued driving contributes to a substantial number of motor vehicle accidents each year. Music listening is often employed as a countermeasure during driving in order to mitigate the effects of fatigue. And though music listening has been established as a distractor in the sense that it increases cognitive load during driving, it is possible that increased cognitive load is desirable under particular circumstances. For instance, during situations that typically result in cognitive underload, such as driving in a low-traffic monotonous stretch of highway, it may be beneficial for cognitive load to increase, thereby necessitating allocation of greater cognitive resources to the task of driving and attenuating fatigue. Here, we employed a song-naming game as a countermeasure to fatigued driving in a simulated monotonous environment. During the first driving session, we established that driving performance deteriorates in the absence of an intervention following 30 min of simulated driving. During the second session, we found that a song-naming game employed at the point of fatigue onset was an effective countermeasure, as reflected by simulated driving performance that met or exceeded fresh driving behavior and was significantly better relative to fatigued performance during the first driving session.},
doi = {10.1016/j.aap.2017.09.002},
journal = {Accident Analysis and Prevention},
number = C,
volume = 108,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on September 18, 2018
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