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Title: Time will tell: A longitudinal investigation of brain-behavior relationships during reading development

Abstract

ERPs are a powerful tool for the study of reading, as they are both temporally precise and functionally specific. These are essential characteristics for studying a process that unfolds rapidly and consists of multiple, interactive subprocesses. In work with adults, clear, specific models exist linking components of the ERP with individual subprocesses of reading including orthographic decoding, phonological processing, and semantic access (e.g., Grainger & Holcomb, 2009). The relationships between ERP components and reading subprocesses are less clear in development; here, we address two questions regarding these relationships. First, we ask whether there are ERP markers that predict future reading behaviors across a longitudinal year. Second, we ask whether any relationships observed between ERP components and reading behavior across time map onto the better-established relationships between ERPs and reading subprocesses in adults. To address these questions, we acquired ERPs from children engaging in a silent reading task and then, a year later, collected behavioral assessments of their reading ability. Finally, we find that ERPs collected in Year 1 do predict reading behaviors a year later. Further, we find that these relationships do conform, at least to some extent, to relationships between ERP components and reading subprocesses observed in adults, with,more » for example, N250 amplitude in Year 1 predicting phonological awareness in Year 2, and N400 amplitude in Year 1 predicting vocabulary in Year 2.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Binghamton Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Psychology
  2. Binghamton Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Psychology; Binghamton Univ., NY (United States). Program in Linguistics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1399877
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-2432J
Journal ID: ISSN 0048-5772; 625589
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; SBE-1422417; SBE-1564046; BCS-1252975
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Psychophysiology (Baltimore)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Psychophysiology (Baltimore); Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 0048-5772
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Language/speech; Infants/children; ERPs; Development

Citation Formats

Stites, Mallory C., and Laszlo, Sarah. Time will tell: A longitudinal investigation of brain-behavior relationships during reading development. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/psyp.12844.
Stites, Mallory C., & Laszlo, Sarah. Time will tell: A longitudinal investigation of brain-behavior relationships during reading development. United States. doi:10.1111/psyp.12844.
Stites, Mallory C., and Laszlo, Sarah. Thu . "Time will tell: A longitudinal investigation of brain-behavior relationships during reading development". United States. doi:10.1111/psyp.12844. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1399877.
@article{osti_1399877,
title = {Time will tell: A longitudinal investigation of brain-behavior relationships during reading development},
author = {Stites, Mallory C. and Laszlo, Sarah},
abstractNote = {ERPs are a powerful tool for the study of reading, as they are both temporally precise and functionally specific. These are essential characteristics for studying a process that unfolds rapidly and consists of multiple, interactive subprocesses. In work with adults, clear, specific models exist linking components of the ERP with individual subprocesses of reading including orthographic decoding, phonological processing, and semantic access (e.g., Grainger & Holcomb, 2009). The relationships between ERP components and reading subprocesses are less clear in development; here, we address two questions regarding these relationships. First, we ask whether there are ERP markers that predict future reading behaviors across a longitudinal year. Second, we ask whether any relationships observed between ERP components and reading behavior across time map onto the better-established relationships between ERPs and reading subprocesses in adults. To address these questions, we acquired ERPs from children engaging in a silent reading task and then, a year later, collected behavioral assessments of their reading ability. Finally, we find that ERPs collected in Year 1 do predict reading behaviors a year later. Further, we find that these relationships do conform, at least to some extent, to relationships between ERP components and reading subprocesses observed in adults, with, for example, N250 amplitude in Year 1 predicting phonological awareness in Year 2, and N400 amplitude in Year 1 predicting vocabulary in Year 2.},
doi = {10.1111/psyp.12844},
journal = {Psychophysiology (Baltimore)},
number = 6,
volume = 54,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Feb 23 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Feb 23 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
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