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Title: A model for simulating adaptive, dynamic flows on networks: Application to petroleum infrastructure

Abstract

Simulation models can greatly improve decisions meant to control the consequences of disruptions to critical infrastructures. We describe a dynamic flow model on networks purposed to inform analyses by those concerned about consequences of disruptions to infrastructures and to help policy makers design robust mitigations. We conceptualize the adaptive responses of infrastructure networks to perturbations as market transactions and business decisions of operators. We approximate commodity flows in these networks by a diffusion equation, with nonlinearities introduced to model capacity limits. To illustrate the behavior and scalability of the model, we show its application first on two simple networks, then on petroleum infrastructure in the United States, where we analyze the effects of a hypothesized earthquake.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
US Department of Homeland Security (DHS); USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1399875
Report Number(s):
SAND-2016-5684J
Journal ID: ISSN 0951-8320; 642557
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; NA0003525
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Reliability Engineering and System Safety
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 169; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0951-8320
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 42 ENGINEERING; Critical infrastructure; Petroleum infrastructure; Infrastructure disruption; Network flow; Resilience metrics

Citation Formats

Corbet, Thomas F., Beyeler, Walt, Wilson, Michael L., and Flanagan, Tatiana P.. A model for simulating adaptive, dynamic flows on networks: Application to petroleum infrastructure. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ress.2017.09.026.
Corbet, Thomas F., Beyeler, Walt, Wilson, Michael L., & Flanagan, Tatiana P.. A model for simulating adaptive, dynamic flows on networks: Application to petroleum infrastructure. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ress.2017.09.026.
Corbet, Thomas F., Beyeler, Walt, Wilson, Michael L., and Flanagan, Tatiana P.. 2017. "A model for simulating adaptive, dynamic flows on networks: Application to petroleum infrastructure". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ress.2017.09.026.
@article{osti_1399875,
title = {A model for simulating adaptive, dynamic flows on networks: Application to petroleum infrastructure},
author = {Corbet, Thomas F. and Beyeler, Walt and Wilson, Michael L. and Flanagan, Tatiana P.},
abstractNote = {Simulation models can greatly improve decisions meant to control the consequences of disruptions to critical infrastructures. We describe a dynamic flow model on networks purposed to inform analyses by those concerned about consequences of disruptions to infrastructures and to help policy makers design robust mitigations. We conceptualize the adaptive responses of infrastructure networks to perturbations as market transactions and business decisions of operators. We approximate commodity flows in these networks by a diffusion equation, with nonlinearities introduced to model capacity limits. To illustrate the behavior and scalability of the model, we show its application first on two simple networks, then on petroleum infrastructure in the United States, where we analyze the effects of a hypothesized earthquake.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ress.2017.09.026},
journal = {Reliability Engineering and System Safety},
number = C,
volume = 169,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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