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Title: Effect of compensatory immigration on the genetic structure of coyotes: Genetic Methods for Detecting Compensation

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. University of Georgia, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken SC 29802 USA
  2. USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, P.O. Box 700 New Ellenton SC 29809 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1399793
Grant/Contract Number:
FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Wildlife Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 81; Journal Issue: 8; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:35:21; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-541X
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kierepka, Elizabeth M., Kilgo, John C., and Rhodes, Jr, Olin E. Effect of compensatory immigration on the genetic structure of coyotes: Genetic Methods for Detecting Compensation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/jwmg.21320.
Kierepka, Elizabeth M., Kilgo, John C., & Rhodes, Jr, Olin E. Effect of compensatory immigration on the genetic structure of coyotes: Genetic Methods for Detecting Compensation. United States. doi:10.1002/jwmg.21320.
Kierepka, Elizabeth M., Kilgo, John C., and Rhodes, Jr, Olin E. 2017. "Effect of compensatory immigration on the genetic structure of coyotes: Genetic Methods for Detecting Compensation". United States. doi:10.1002/jwmg.21320.
@article{osti_1399793,
title = {Effect of compensatory immigration on the genetic structure of coyotes: Genetic Methods for Detecting Compensation},
author = {Kierepka, Elizabeth M. and Kilgo, John C. and Rhodes, Jr, Olin E.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/jwmg.21320},
journal = {Journal of Wildlife Management},
number = 8,
volume = 81,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 28, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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