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Title: IAXO, next-generation of helioscopes

Abstract

The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) is a forth generation axion helioscope designed to detect solar axions and axion-like particles (ALPs) with a coupling to the photon gaγ down to a few 10 -12 GeV -1, 1.5 orders of magnitude beyond the current best astrophysical and experimental upper bounds. This range includes parameter values invoked in the context of the observed anomalies in light propagation over astronomical distances and to explain the excessive cooling observed in a number of stellar objects. Here we review the status of the IAXO project and of its potential to probe the most physically motivated regions of the axion/ALPs parameter space.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Barry Univ., Miami Shores, FL (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
Contributing Org.:
IAXO Collaboration
OSTI Identifier:
1399715
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-739048
Journal ID: ISSN 1824-8039
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
PoS Proceedings of Science
Additional Journal Information:
Conference: 38th International Conference on High Energy Physics:, Chicago, IL (United States), 3-10 August 2016; Journal ID: ISSN 1824-8039
Publisher:
SISSA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS

Citation Formats

Giannotti, M., Ruz, J., and Vogel, J. K. IAXO, next-generation of helioscopes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Giannotti, M., Ruz, J., & Vogel, J. K. IAXO, next-generation of helioscopes. United States.
Giannotti, M., Ruz, J., and Vogel, J. K. Wed . "IAXO, next-generation of helioscopes". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1399715.
@article{osti_1399715,
title = {IAXO, next-generation of helioscopes},
author = {Giannotti, M. and Ruz, J. and Vogel, J. K.},
abstractNote = {The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) is a forth generation axion helioscope designed to detect solar axions and axion-like particles (ALPs) with a coupling to the photon gaγ down to a few 10-12 GeV-1, 1.5 orders of magnitude beyond the current best astrophysical and experimental upper bounds. This range includes parameter values invoked in the context of the observed anomalies in light propagation over astronomical distances and to explain the excessive cooling observed in a number of stellar objects. Here we review the status of the IAXO project and of its potential to probe the most physically motivated regions of the axion/ALPs parameter space.},
doi = {},
journal = {PoS Proceedings of Science},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Sep 27 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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  • The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) is a proposed 4 th-generation axion helioscope with the primary physics research goal to search for solar axions via their Primakoff conversion into photons of 1 – 10 keV energies in a strong magnetic field. IAXO will achieve a sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling g down to a few ×10⁻¹² GeV⁻¹ for a wide range of axion masses up to ~ 0.25 eV. This is an improvement over the currently best (3 rd generation) axion helioscope, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), of about 5 orders of magnitude in signal strength, corresponding to amore » factor ~ 20 in the axion photon coupling. IAXO’s sensitivity relies on the construction of a large superconducting 8-coil toroidal magnet of 20 m length optimized for axion research. Each of the eight 60 cm diameter magnet bores is equipped with x-ray optics focusing the signal photons into ~ 0.2 cm² spots that are imaged by very low background x-ray detectors. The magnet will be built into a structure with elevation and azimuth drives that will allow solar tracking for 12 hours each day. This contribution is a summary of our papers [1, 2, 3] and we refer to these for further details.« less
  • The effects of absorption in the gas, and of density variations on the sensitivity of gas-filled solar-axion helioscopes, are theoretically investigated. It is concluded that the 10-meter long CAST helioscope, the most sensitive experiment to date, is near the limit of sensitivity in axion mass. Increasing the length, gas density, or tilt angle all have negative influences and will not improve the sensitivity.
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