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Title: Infrared absorption and visible transparency in heavily doped p-type BaSnO 3

Abstract

The recent experimental work shows that perovskite BaSnO 3 can be heavily doped by K to become a stable p-type semiconductor. Here, we find that p-type perovskite BaSnO 3 retains transparency for visible light while absorbing strongly in the infrared below 1.5 eV. The origin of the remarkable optical transparency even with heavy doping is that the interband transitions that are enabled by empty states at the top of the valence band are concentrated mainly in the energy range from 0.5 to 1.5 eV, i.e., not extending past the near IR. In contrast to n-type, the Burstein-Moss shift is slightly negative, but very small reflecting the heavier valence bands relative to the conduction bands.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1399687
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1351029
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0014607
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Transparent conductor

Citation Formats

Li, Yuwei, Sun, Jifeng, and Singh, David J. Infrared absorption and visible transparency in heavily doped p-type BaSnO3. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4975686.
Li, Yuwei, Sun, Jifeng, & Singh, David J. Infrared absorption and visible transparency in heavily doped p-type BaSnO3. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4975686.
Li, Yuwei, Sun, Jifeng, and Singh, David J. Mon . "Infrared absorption and visible transparency in heavily doped p-type BaSnO3". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4975686. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1399687.
@article{osti_1399687,
title = {Infrared absorption and visible transparency in heavily doped p-type BaSnO3},
author = {Li, Yuwei and Sun, Jifeng and Singh, David J.},
abstractNote = {The recent experimental work shows that perovskite BaSnO3 can be heavily doped by K to become a stable p-type semiconductor. Here, we find that p-type perovskite BaSnO3 retains transparency for visible light while absorbing strongly in the infrared below 1.5 eV. The origin of the remarkable optical transparency even with heavy doping is that the interband transitions that are enabled by empty states at the top of the valence band are concentrated mainly in the energy range from 0.5 to 1.5 eV, i.e., not extending past the near IR. In contrast to n-type, the Burstein-Moss shift is slightly negative, but very small reflecting the heavier valence bands relative to the conduction bands.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4975686},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 5,
volume = 110,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Jan 30 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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