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Title: An Organic Semiconductor Organized into 3D DNA Arrays by “Bottom-up” Rational Design

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York NY 10003 USA
  2. Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette IN 47907 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1399624
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0007991
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Angewandte Chemie
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 129; Journal Issue: 23; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-16 05:06:31; Journal ID: ISSN 0044-8249
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wang, Xiao, Sha, Ruojie, Kristiansen, Martin, Hernandez, Carina, Hao, Yudong, Mao, Chengde, Canary, James W., and Seeman, Nadrian C.. An Organic Semiconductor Organized into 3D DNA Arrays by “Bottom-up” Rational Design. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/ange.201700462.
Wang, Xiao, Sha, Ruojie, Kristiansen, Martin, Hernandez, Carina, Hao, Yudong, Mao, Chengde, Canary, James W., & Seeman, Nadrian C.. An Organic Semiconductor Organized into 3D DNA Arrays by “Bottom-up” Rational Design. Germany. doi:10.1002/ange.201700462.
Wang, Xiao, Sha, Ruojie, Kristiansen, Martin, Hernandez, Carina, Hao, Yudong, Mao, Chengde, Canary, James W., and Seeman, Nadrian C.. Wed . "An Organic Semiconductor Organized into 3D DNA Arrays by “Bottom-up” Rational Design". Germany. doi:10.1002/ange.201700462.
@article{osti_1399624,
title = {An Organic Semiconductor Organized into 3D DNA Arrays by “Bottom-up” Rational Design},
author = {Wang, Xiao and Sha, Ruojie and Kristiansen, Martin and Hernandez, Carina and Hao, Yudong and Mao, Chengde and Canary, James W. and Seeman, Nadrian C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/ange.201700462},
journal = {Angewandte Chemie},
number = 23,
volume = 129,
place = {Germany},
year = {Wed May 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed May 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1002/ange.201700462

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