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Title: The influence of interfacial slip on two-phase flow in rough pores

Abstract

The migration and trapping of supercritical CO 2 (scCO 2) in geologic carbon storage is strongly dependent on the geometry and wettability of the pore network in the reservoir rock. During displacement, resident fluids may become trapped in the pits of a rough pore surface forming an immiscible two-phase fluid interface with the invading fluid, allowing apparent slip flow at this interface. We present a two-phase fluid dynamics model, including interfacial tension, to characterize the impact of mineral surface roughness on this slip flow. We show that the slip flow can be cast in more familiar terms as a contact-angle (wettability)-dependent effective permeability to the invading fluid, a nondimensional measurement which relates the interfacial slip to the pore geometry. The analysis shows the surface roughness-induced slip flow can effectively increase or decrease this effective permeability, depending on the wettability and roughness of the mineral surfaces. Configurations of the pore geometry where interfacial slip has a tangible influence on permeability have been identified. The results suggest that for large roughness features, permeability to CO 2 may be enhanced by approximately 30% during drainage, while the permeability to brine during reimbibition may be enhanced or diminished by 60%, depending on the contactmore » angle with the mineral surfaces and degrees of roughness. For smaller roughness features, the changes in permeability through interfacial slip are small. As a result, a much larger range of effective permeabilities are suggested for general fluid pairs and contact angles, including occlusion of the pore by the trapped phase.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1399564
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-8481J
Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397; 656084
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Water Resources Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; carbon sequestration; slip flow; permeability; surface roughness; wetting angle

Citation Formats

Kucala, Alec, Martinez, Mario J., Wang, Yifeng, and Noble, David R. The influence of interfacial slip on two-phase flow in rough pores. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2016WR020059.
Kucala, Alec, Martinez, Mario J., Wang, Yifeng, & Noble, David R. The influence of interfacial slip on two-phase flow in rough pores. United States. doi:10.1002/2016WR020059.
Kucala, Alec, Martinez, Mario J., Wang, Yifeng, and Noble, David R. Tue . "The influence of interfacial slip on two-phase flow in rough pores". United States. doi:10.1002/2016WR020059.
@article{osti_1399564,
title = {The influence of interfacial slip on two-phase flow in rough pores},
author = {Kucala, Alec and Martinez, Mario J. and Wang, Yifeng and Noble, David R.},
abstractNote = {The migration and trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) in geologic carbon storage is strongly dependent on the geometry and wettability of the pore network in the reservoir rock. During displacement, resident fluids may become trapped in the pits of a rough pore surface forming an immiscible two-phase fluid interface with the invading fluid, allowing apparent slip flow at this interface. We present a two-phase fluid dynamics model, including interfacial tension, to characterize the impact of mineral surface roughness on this slip flow. We show that the slip flow can be cast in more familiar terms as a contact-angle (wettability)-dependent effective permeability to the invading fluid, a nondimensional measurement which relates the interfacial slip to the pore geometry. The analysis shows the surface roughness-induced slip flow can effectively increase or decrease this effective permeability, depending on the wettability and roughness of the mineral surfaces. Configurations of the pore geometry where interfacial slip has a tangible influence on permeability have been identified. The results suggest that for large roughness features, permeability to CO2 may be enhanced by approximately 30% during drainage, while the permeability to brine during reimbibition may be enhanced or diminished by 60%, depending on the contact angle with the mineral surfaces and degrees of roughness. For smaller roughness features, the changes in permeability through interfacial slip are small. As a result, a much larger range of effective permeabilities are suggested for general fluid pairs and contact angles, including occlusion of the pore by the trapped phase.},
doi = {10.1002/2016WR020059},
journal = {Water Resources Research},
number = 8,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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  • Two-phase (air-water) flow experiments were conducted in horizontal artificial fractures. The fractures were between glass plates that were either smooth or artificially roughened by gluing a layer of glass beads to them. One smooth fracture with an aperture of 1 mm and three rough fractures, one with the two surfaces in contact and two without contact, were studied. For both types of fractures, the flow structures are similar to those observed in two-phase flow in a pipe, with structures (bubbles, fingering bubbles, films, and drops) depending on the gas and liquid flow rates. The pressure gradients measured for different liquidmore » and gas velocities were interpreted by three models. First, using Darcy's law leads to relative permeability curves similar to conventional ones for porous media. However, these curves depend not only on saturation but also on flow rats. This effect is caused by inertial forces which are not included in this approach. Second, the standard approach for two-phase flow in pipes (Lockhart and Martinelli's equation) agrees with experimental results, at least for small pressure gradients. Finally, the best fit was obtained by treating the two phases as one homogeneous phase. All the properties are averaged, and the pressure drop is deduced from an empirical correlation between the two-phase Reynolds number and the friction factor. 22 refs., 11 figs.« less
  • A laboratory flow apparatus was used to visualize and measure two-phase gas-liquid flows in natural rough-walled rock fractures. Experiments at carefully controlled flow rate and pressure conditions have been performed using a natural fracture and three transparent fracture replicas. Two-phase flow exhibited persistent instabilities with cyclic pressure and flow rate variations even under conditions of constant applied boundary conditions. Visual observations of changes in pore occupancy showed that the instabilities could be explained as resulting from an interplay between capillary effects and pressure drop due to viscous flow. Measurements of relative permeabilities indicated strong phase interference, with relative permeabilities reducedmore » to very small values at intermediate saturations for both wetting and nonwetting phases. These results run counter to a conventional view of fracture relative permeabilities that assumes that the relative permeability of each phase is equal to its saturation, but the results are consistent with recent models that view fractures as two-dimensional heterogeneous porous media. 35 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • A new approach towards the prediction of the interfacial friction factor in two-phase wavy film flow is presented. It is shown that the associated interfacial shear and pressure drop are directly related to the waviness characteristics and to the mobility of the interface. Comparison of the predicted interfacial shear factor with experiment for cocurrent downwards annular flow is satisfactory. The proposed approach appears to offer a possibility for closed form modelling of the interfacial shear and wave characteristics.