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Title: The influence of interfacial slip on two-phase flow in rough pores

Abstract

The migration and trapping of supercritical CO 2 (scCO 2) in geologic carbon storage is strongly dependent on the geometry and wettability of the pore network in the reservoir rock. During displacement, resident fluids may become trapped in the pits of a rough pore surface forming an immiscible two-phase fluid interface with the invading fluid, allowing apparent slip flow at this interface. We present a two-phase fluid dynamics model, including interfacial tension, to characterize the impact of mineral surface roughness on this slip flow. We show that the slip flow can be cast in more familiar terms as a contact-angle (wettability)-dependent effective permeability to the invading fluid, a nondimensional measurement which relates the interfacial slip to the pore geometry. The analysis shows the surface roughness-induced slip flow can effectively increase or decrease this effective permeability, depending on the wettability and roughness of the mineral surfaces. Configurations of the pore geometry where interfacial slip has a tangible influence on permeability have been identified. The results suggest that for large roughness features, permeability to CO 2 may be enhanced by approximately 30% during drainage, while the permeability to brine during reimbibition may be enhanced or diminished by 60%, depending on the contactmore » angle with the mineral surfaces and degrees of roughness. For smaller roughness features, the changes in permeability through interfacial slip are small. As a result, a much larger range of effective permeabilities are suggested for general fluid pairs and contact angles, including occlusion of the pore by the trapped phase.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security (CFSES)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1399564
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-8481J
Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397; 656084
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Water Resources Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; carbon sequestration; slip flow; permeability; surface roughness; wetting angle

Citation Formats

Kucala, Alec, Martinez, Mario J., Wang, Yifeng, and Noble, David R. The influence of interfacial slip on two-phase flow in rough pores. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/2016WR020059.
Kucala, Alec, Martinez, Mario J., Wang, Yifeng, & Noble, David R. The influence of interfacial slip on two-phase flow in rough pores. United States. doi:10.1002/2016WR020059.
Kucala, Alec, Martinez, Mario J., Wang, Yifeng, and Noble, David R. Tue . "The influence of interfacial slip on two-phase flow in rough pores". United States. doi:10.1002/2016WR020059. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1399564.
@article{osti_1399564,
title = {The influence of interfacial slip on two-phase flow in rough pores},
author = {Kucala, Alec and Martinez, Mario J. and Wang, Yifeng and Noble, David R.},
abstractNote = {The migration and trapping of supercritical CO2 (scCO2) in geologic carbon storage is strongly dependent on the geometry and wettability of the pore network in the reservoir rock. During displacement, resident fluids may become trapped in the pits of a rough pore surface forming an immiscible two-phase fluid interface with the invading fluid, allowing apparent slip flow at this interface. We present a two-phase fluid dynamics model, including interfacial tension, to characterize the impact of mineral surface roughness on this slip flow. We show that the slip flow can be cast in more familiar terms as a contact-angle (wettability)-dependent effective permeability to the invading fluid, a nondimensional measurement which relates the interfacial slip to the pore geometry. The analysis shows the surface roughness-induced slip flow can effectively increase or decrease this effective permeability, depending on the wettability and roughness of the mineral surfaces. Configurations of the pore geometry where interfacial slip has a tangible influence on permeability have been identified. The results suggest that for large roughness features, permeability to CO2 may be enhanced by approximately 30% during drainage, while the permeability to brine during reimbibition may be enhanced or diminished by 60%, depending on the contact angle with the mineral surfaces and degrees of roughness. For smaller roughness features, the changes in permeability through interfacial slip are small. As a result, a much larger range of effective permeabilities are suggested for general fluid pairs and contact angles, including occlusion of the pore by the trapped phase.},
doi = {10.1002/2016WR020059},
journal = {Water Resources Research},
number = 8,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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