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Title: Image quality, meteorological optical range, and fog particulate number evaluation using the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber

Abstract

The evaluation of optical system performance in fog conditions typically requires field testing. This can be challenging due to the unpredictable nature of fog generation and the temporal and spatial nonuniformity of the phenomenon itself. We describe the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber, a new test facility that enables the repeatable generation of fog within a 55 m×3 m×3 m (L×W×H) environment, and demonstrate the fog chamber through a series of optical tests. These tests are performed to evaluate system image quality, determine meteorological optical range (MOR), and measure the number of particles in the atmosphere. Relationships between typical optical quality metrics, MOR values, and total number of fog particles are described using the data obtained from the fog chamber and repeated over a series of three tests.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1399487
Report Number(s):
SAND2017-0636J
Journal ID: ISSN 0091-3286; 650597
Grant/Contract Number:
NA0003525
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Optical Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 56; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0091-3286
Publisher:
SPIE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; fog; image quality; optical testing; fiber optic gyroscopes; atmospheric particles

Citation Formats

Birch, Gabriel C., Woo, Bryana L., Sanchez, Andres L., and Knapp, Haley. Image quality, meteorological optical range, and fog particulate number evaluation using the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1117/1.oe.56.8.085104.
Birch, Gabriel C., Woo, Bryana L., Sanchez, Andres L., & Knapp, Haley. Image quality, meteorological optical range, and fog particulate number evaluation using the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber. United States. doi:10.1117/1.oe.56.8.085104.
Birch, Gabriel C., Woo, Bryana L., Sanchez, Andres L., and Knapp, Haley. 2017. "Image quality, meteorological optical range, and fog particulate number evaluation using the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber". United States. doi:10.1117/1.oe.56.8.085104. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1399487.
@article{osti_1399487,
title = {Image quality, meteorological optical range, and fog particulate number evaluation using the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber},
author = {Birch, Gabriel C. and Woo, Bryana L. and Sanchez, Andres L. and Knapp, Haley},
abstractNote = {The evaluation of optical system performance in fog conditions typically requires field testing. This can be challenging due to the unpredictable nature of fog generation and the temporal and spatial nonuniformity of the phenomenon itself. We describe the Sandia National Laboratories fog chamber, a new test facility that enables the repeatable generation of fog within a 55 m×3 m×3 m (L×W×H) environment, and demonstrate the fog chamber through a series of optical tests. These tests are performed to evaluate system image quality, determine meteorological optical range (MOR), and measure the number of particles in the atmosphere. Relationships between typical optical quality metrics, MOR values, and total number of fog particles are described using the data obtained from the fog chamber and repeated over a series of three tests.},
doi = {10.1117/1.oe.56.8.085104},
journal = {Optical Engineering},
number = 8,
volume = 56,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
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