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Title: Plant Succession on the Mount St. Helen's Debris-Avalanche Deposit and the Role of Non-native Species

Abstract

The abstract is published online only. If you did not include a short abstract for the online version when you submitted the manuscript, the first paragraph or the first 10 lines of the chapter will be displayed here. If possible, please provide us with an informative abstract. The debris-avalanche deposit is one of the most disturbed areas created by the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, with little survival of a few plant fragments and primary succession mostly being initiated by the seeds dispersed onto the newly emplaced material. Vegetation changes on the debris-avalanche deposit during the first 30 years post eruption are analyzed considering the role of non-native species and potential future vegetation patterns on the deposit. We found that the aerial distribution of largely non-native seeds on a subset of plots at Mount St. Helens in 1980 has had a pronounced and enduring effect on subsequent vegetation communities.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Eastern Oregon Agricultural Research center
  2. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1399404
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Denton, Elsie M., and Dale, Virginia H. Plant Succession on the Mount St. Helen's Debris-Avalanche Deposit and the Role of Non-native Species. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Denton, Elsie M., & Dale, Virginia H. Plant Succession on the Mount St. Helen's Debris-Avalanche Deposit and the Role of Non-native Species. United States.
Denton, Elsie M., and Dale, Virginia H. Fri . "Plant Succession on the Mount St. Helen's Debris-Avalanche Deposit and the Role of Non-native Species". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1399404,
title = {Plant Succession on the Mount St. Helen's Debris-Avalanche Deposit and the Role of Non-native Species},
author = {Denton, Elsie M. and Dale, Virginia H.},
abstractNote = {The abstract is published online only. If you did not include a short abstract for the online version when you submitted the manuscript, the first paragraph or the first 10 lines of the chapter will be displayed here. If possible, please provide us with an informative abstract. The debris-avalanche deposit is one of the most disturbed areas created by the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, with little survival of a few plant fragments and primary succession mostly being initiated by the seeds dispersed onto the newly emplaced material. Vegetation changes on the debris-avalanche deposit during the first 30 years post eruption are analyzed considering the role of non-native species and potential future vegetation patterns on the deposit. We found that the aerial distribution of largely non-native seeds on a subset of plots at Mount St. Helens in 1980 has had a pronounced and enduring effect on subsequent vegetation communities.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Book:
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