skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Coarse Particulate Organic Matter: Storage, Transport, and Retention

Abstract

Coarse particulate organic matter, or CPOM, is a basal energy and nutrient resource in many stream ecosystems and is provided by inputs from the riparian zone, incoming tributaries, and to a lesser extent from in-stream production. The ability of a stream to retain CPOM or slow its transport is critical to its consumption and assimilation by stream biota. In this chapter, we describe basic exercises to measure (1) the amount of CPOM in the streambed and (2) the retention of CPOM from standardized particle releases. We further describe advanced exercises that (1) experimentally enhance the retentiveness of a stream reach and (2) measure organic carbon transport and turnover (i.e., spiraling) in the channel.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Oakland University, Rochester, MI
  2. University of Notre Dame, IN
  3. University of Central Arkansas
  4. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1399398
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Tiegs, Scott, Lamberti, Gary A., Entrekin, Sally A., and Griffiths, Natalie A.. Coarse Particulate Organic Matter: Storage, Transport, and Retention. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Tiegs, Scott, Lamberti, Gary A., Entrekin, Sally A., & Griffiths, Natalie A.. Coarse Particulate Organic Matter: Storage, Transport, and Retention. United States.
Tiegs, Scott, Lamberti, Gary A., Entrekin, Sally A., and Griffiths, Natalie A.. 2017. "Coarse Particulate Organic Matter: Storage, Transport, and Retention". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1399398,
title = {Coarse Particulate Organic Matter: Storage, Transport, and Retention},
author = {Tiegs, Scott and Lamberti, Gary A. and Entrekin, Sally A. and Griffiths, Natalie A.},
abstractNote = {Coarse particulate organic matter, or CPOM, is a basal energy and nutrient resource in many stream ecosystems and is provided by inputs from the riparian zone, incoming tributaries, and to a lesser extent from in-stream production. The ability of a stream to retain CPOM or slow its transport is critical to its consumption and assimilation by stream biota. In this chapter, we describe basic exercises to measure (1) the amount of CPOM in the streambed and (2) the retention of CPOM from standardized particle releases. We further describe advanced exercises that (1) experimentally enhance the retentiveness of a stream reach and (2) measure organic carbon transport and turnover (i.e., spiraling) in the channel.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Book:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this book.

Save / Share:
  • Coarse particulate organic matter, or CPOM, is a basal energy and nutrient resource in many stream ecosystems and is provided by inputs from the riparian zone, incoming tributaries, and to a lesser extent from in-stream production. The ability of a stream to retain CPOM or slow its transport is critical to its consumption and assimilation by stream biota. In this chapter, we describe basic exercises to measure (1) the amount of CPOM in the streambed and (2) the retention of CPOM from standardized particle releases. We further describe advanced exercises that (1) experimentally enhance the retentiveness of a stream reachmore » and (2) measure organic carbon transport and turnover (i.e., spiraling) in the channel.« less
  • This report evaluates available studies concerning the carcinogenic effects of polycyclic organic matter (POM). The environmental appraisal of POM (sources, characteristics) appears in chapters 2-5. Studies of the effects of POM in animals, mammalian cells, and vegetation are discussed in the next nine chapters. The human effects of POM are described, on the basis of extensive epidemiologic studies, in Chapters 15, 16, and 17. The methodology of collecting and analyzing atmospheric POM is set forth in Appendixes A, B, and C. 836 references, 10 figures, 50 tables.
  • Historically, attention on soil organic matter (SOM) has focused on the central role that it plays in ecosystem fertility and soil properties, but in the past two decades the role of soil organic carbon in moderating atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations has emerged as a critical research area. This chapter will focus on the storage and turnover of natural organic matter in soil (SOM), in the context of the global carbon cycle. Organic matter in soils is the largest carbon reservoir in rapid exchange with atmospheric CO{sub 2}, and is thus important as a potential source and sink of greenhouse gasesmore » over time scales of human concern (Fischlin and Gyalistras 1997). SOM is also an important human resource under active management in agricultural and range lands worldwide. Questions driving present research on the soil C cycle include: Are soils now acting as a net source or sink of carbon to the atmosphere? What role will soils play as a natural modulator or amplifier of climatic warming? How is C stabilized and sequestered, and what are effective management techniques to foster these processes? Answering these questions will require a mechanistic understanding of how and where C is stored in soils. The quantity and composition of organic matter in soil reflect the long-term balance between plant carbon inputs and microbial decomposition, as well as other loss processes such as fire, erosion, and leaching. The processes driving soil carbon storage and turnover are complex and involve influences at molecular to global scales. Moreover, the relative importance of these processes varies according to the temporal and spatial scales being considered; a process that is important at the regional scale may not be critical at the pedon scale. At the regional scale, SOM cycling is influenced by factors such as climate and parent material, which affect plant productivity and soil development. More locally, factors such as plant tissue quality and soil mineralogy affect decomposition pathways and stabilization. These factors influence the stability of SOM in part by shaping its molecular characteristics, which play a fundamental role in nearly all processes governing SOM stability but are not the focus of this chapter. We review here the most important controls on the distribution and dynamics of SOM at plot to global scales, and methods used to study them. We also explore the concepts of controls, processes, and mechanisms, and how they operate across scales. The concept of SOM turnover, or mean residence time, is central to this chapter and so it is described in some detail. The Appendix details the use of radiocarbon ({sup 14}C), a powerful isotopic tool for studying SOM dynamics. Much of the material here was originally presented at a NATO Advanced Study Institute on 'Soils and Global Change: Carbon Cycle, Trace Gas Exchange and Hydrology', held June 16-27, 1997, at the Chateau de Bonas, France.« less
  • This six-volume report describes a series of coarse coal hydraulic transport tests performed at the Hydraulic Transport Research Facility at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Bruceton, PA. The primary objective of the research covered in this volume was to examine the performance of the 12-inch (300 mm) pipeline in transporting clean, 2-inch by 0 (51 mm by minus 50 mm) coal at velocities ranging from 5 to 18 ft/s (1.5 to 5/5 m/s) and concentrations ranging from 15 to 55 pct by weight. Head loss and deposition conditions for future system design were quantified, and the effects of coal sizemore » distribution on hydraulic parameters, and the coal degradation rates caused by the pipeline and pumps, are also discussed.« less
  • A review and evaluation of historical and recent survey data indicate that acidification and the disappearance of fish from some Adirondack waters does not appear to be caused solely by acid rain. Factors that can also cause acidification or reduce fish stocks include certain intolerable environmental conditions, certain fisheries management and recreational fishing activities, and changes in land-use activities. The principal fisheries management factors alternative to acid precipitation that may affect the status of Adirondack fish stocks involve dependence of numerous waters upon annual stocking, availability of adequate numbers of health fish from the hatchery, damaging effects of pesticide programs,more » negative influence of beaver activities upon certain fish habitats, and adverse effects of such activities as heavy recreational fishing pressures. Separate abstracts were prepared for two articles selected for the Energy Data Base and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis. 120 references, 7 figures, 14 tables.« less