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Title: Time evolution and asymmetry of a laser produced blast wave

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [1];  [3];  [3];  [1]; ORCiD logo [4];  [5];  [4];  [2];  [5];  [4];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
  2. Central Laser Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell, Oxford, Didcot OX11 0QX, United Kingdom
  3. Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD, United Kingdom
  4. Department of Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN, United Kingdom
  5. Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1399292
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0016566; FWP 57789
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physics of Plasmas
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 10; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-14 13:18:53; Journal ID: ISSN 1070-664X
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Tubman, E. R., Scott, R. H. H., Doyle, H. W., Meinecke, J., Ahmed, H., Alraddadi, R. A. B., Bolis, R., Cross, J. E., Crowston, R., Doria, D., Lamb, D., Reville, B., Robinson, A. P. L., Tzeferacos, P., Borghesi, M., Gregori, G., and Woolsey, N. C.. Time evolution and asymmetry of a laser produced blast wave. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4987038.
Tubman, E. R., Scott, R. H. H., Doyle, H. W., Meinecke, J., Ahmed, H., Alraddadi, R. A. B., Bolis, R., Cross, J. E., Crowston, R., Doria, D., Lamb, D., Reville, B., Robinson, A. P. L., Tzeferacos, P., Borghesi, M., Gregori, G., & Woolsey, N. C.. Time evolution and asymmetry of a laser produced blast wave. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4987038.
Tubman, E. R., Scott, R. H. H., Doyle, H. W., Meinecke, J., Ahmed, H., Alraddadi, R. A. B., Bolis, R., Cross, J. E., Crowston, R., Doria, D., Lamb, D., Reville, B., Robinson, A. P. L., Tzeferacos, P., Borghesi, M., Gregori, G., and Woolsey, N. C.. 2017. "Time evolution and asymmetry of a laser produced blast wave". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4987038.
@article{osti_1399292,
title = {Time evolution and asymmetry of a laser produced blast wave},
author = {Tubman, E. R. and Scott, R. H. H. and Doyle, H. W. and Meinecke, J. and Ahmed, H. and Alraddadi, R. A. B. and Bolis, R. and Cross, J. E. and Crowston, R. and Doria, D. and Lamb, D. and Reville, B. and Robinson, A. P. L. and Tzeferacos, P. and Borghesi, M. and Gregori, G. and Woolsey, N. C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4987038},
journal = {Physics of Plasmas},
number = 10,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.4987038

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