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Title: Memristive devices from ZnO nanowire bundles and meshes

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [1]; ORCiD logo [3];  [5];  [6]
  1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA
  2. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA, Department of Physics and Materials Science, University of Memphis, Memphis, Tennessee 38152, USA
  3. Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA
  4. Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA
  5. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA
  6. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235, USA, Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1399278
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-09ER46554
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 111; Journal Issue: 15; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-14 10:56:21; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-6951
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Puzyrev, Y. S., Shen, X., Zhang, C. X., Hachtel, J., Ni, K., Choi, B. K., Zhang, E. -X., Ovchinnikov, O., Schrimpf, R. D., Fleetwood, D. M., and Pantelides, S. T. Memristive devices from ZnO nanowire bundles and meshes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5008265.
Puzyrev, Y. S., Shen, X., Zhang, C. X., Hachtel, J., Ni, K., Choi, B. K., Zhang, E. -X., Ovchinnikov, O., Schrimpf, R. D., Fleetwood, D. M., & Pantelides, S. T. Memristive devices from ZnO nanowire bundles and meshes. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5008265.
Puzyrev, Y. S., Shen, X., Zhang, C. X., Hachtel, J., Ni, K., Choi, B. K., Zhang, E. -X., Ovchinnikov, O., Schrimpf, R. D., Fleetwood, D. M., and Pantelides, S. T. 2017. "Memristive devices from ZnO nanowire bundles and meshes". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5008265.
@article{osti_1399278,
title = {Memristive devices from ZnO nanowire bundles and meshes},
author = {Puzyrev, Y. S. and Shen, X. and Zhang, C. X. and Hachtel, J. and Ni, K. and Choi, B. K. and Zhang, E. -X. and Ovchinnikov, O. and Schrimpf, R. D. and Fleetwood, D. M. and Pantelides, S. T.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.5008265},
journal = {Applied Physics Letters},
number = 15,
volume = 111,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on October 13, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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