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Title: Best Practices to Promote Diversity and Facilitate Inclusion

Abstract

The intent of this guide is to provide a set of “best practices” for leaders to promote diversity and facilitate inclusion within their organization and throughout Sandia National Laboratories. These “best practices” are derived from personal experiences and build upon existing resources at Sandia to help us effect change to realize an inclusive work environment. As leaders, we play a critical role in setting the vision and shaping the culture of the organization by communicating expectations and modeling inclusive behavior. The “best practices” in this guide are presented in the spirit of promoting a learning culture that values continuous improvement in the ongoing effort to make diversity and inclusion an integral part of all that we do at Sandia. This guide seeks to articulate the importance of leading through example, taking positive actions, raising awareness of practices that provide an inclusive environment, and creating a space that welcomes diverse perspectives and input.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1399211
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-10778R
657573
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000; NA0003525
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS

Citation Formats

Rosenthal, Mark A., and Snyder, Johann D.. Best Practices to Promote Diversity and Facilitate Inclusion. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1399211.
Rosenthal, Mark A., & Snyder, Johann D.. Best Practices to Promote Diversity and Facilitate Inclusion. United States. doi:10.2172/1399211.
Rosenthal, Mark A., and Snyder, Johann D.. 2017. "Best Practices to Promote Diversity and Facilitate Inclusion". United States. doi:10.2172/1399211. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1399211.
@article{osti_1399211,
title = {Best Practices to Promote Diversity and Facilitate Inclusion},
author = {Rosenthal, Mark A. and Snyder, Johann D.},
abstractNote = {The intent of this guide is to provide a set of “best practices” for leaders to promote diversity and facilitate inclusion within their organization and throughout Sandia National Laboratories. These “best practices” are derived from personal experiences and build upon existing resources at Sandia to help us effect change to realize an inclusive work environment. As leaders, we play a critical role in setting the vision and shaping the culture of the organization by communicating expectations and modeling inclusive behavior. The “best practices” in this guide are presented in the spirit of promoting a learning culture that values continuous improvement in the ongoing effort to make diversity and inclusion an integral part of all that we do at Sandia. This guide seeks to articulate the importance of leading through example, taking positive actions, raising awareness of practices that provide an inclusive environment, and creating a space that welcomes diverse perspectives and input.},
doi = {10.2172/1399211},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Technical Report:

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