skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Comparing identified and statistically significant lipids and polar metabolites in 15-year old serum and dried blood spot samples for longitudinal studies: Comparing lipids and metabolites in serum and DBS samples

Abstract

The use of dried blood spots (DBS) has many advantages over traditional plasma and serum samples such as smaller blood volume required, storage at room temperature, and ability for sampling in remote locations. However, understanding the robustness of different analytes in DBS samples is essential, especially in older samples collected for longitudinal studies. Here we analyzed DBS samples collected in 2000-2001 and stored at room temperature and compared them to matched serum samples stored at -80°C to determine if they could be effectively used as specific time points in a longitudinal study following metabolic disease. Four hundred small molecules were identified in both the serum and DBS samples using gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS) and LC-ion mobility spectrometry-MS (LC-IMS-MS). The identified polar metabolites overlapped well between the sample types, though only one statistically significant polar metabolite in a case-control study was conserved, indicating degradation occurs in the DBS samples affecting quantitation. Differences in the lipid identifications indicated that some oxidation occurs in the DBS samples. However, thirty-six statistically significant lipids correlated in both sample types indicating that lipid quantitation was more stable across the sample types.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Earth and Biological Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA
  2. National Security Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA
  3. Department of Medicine, Bone and Mineral Unit, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland OR USA; Research Service, Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland OR USA
  4. Department of Medicine, Bone and Mineral Unit, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland OR USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1399180
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-121197
Journal ID: ISSN 0951-4198; 48199; 49531; 48680; KP1601010; 453040220; 400412000; WN9030198
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory

Citation Formats

Kyle, Jennifer E., Casey, Cameron P., Stratton, Kelly G., Zink, Erika M., Kim, Young-Mo, Zheng, Xueyun, Monroe, Matthew E., Weitz, Karl K., Bloodsworth, Kent J., Orton, Daniel J., Ibrahim, Yehia M., Moore, Ronald J., Lee, Christine G., Pedersen, Catherine, Orwoll, Eric, Smith, Richard D., Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E., and Baker, Erin S. Comparing identified and statistically significant lipids and polar metabolites in 15-year old serum and dried blood spot samples for longitudinal studies: Comparing lipids and metabolites in serum and DBS samples. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/rcm.7808.
Kyle, Jennifer E., Casey, Cameron P., Stratton, Kelly G., Zink, Erika M., Kim, Young-Mo, Zheng, Xueyun, Monroe, Matthew E., Weitz, Karl K., Bloodsworth, Kent J., Orton, Daniel J., Ibrahim, Yehia M., Moore, Ronald J., Lee, Christine G., Pedersen, Catherine, Orwoll, Eric, Smith, Richard D., Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E., & Baker, Erin S. Comparing identified and statistically significant lipids and polar metabolites in 15-year old serum and dried blood spot samples for longitudinal studies: Comparing lipids and metabolites in serum and DBS samples. United States. doi:10.1002/rcm.7808.
Kyle, Jennifer E., Casey, Cameron P., Stratton, Kelly G., Zink, Erika M., Kim, Young-Mo, Zheng, Xueyun, Monroe, Matthew E., Weitz, Karl K., Bloodsworth, Kent J., Orton, Daniel J., Ibrahim, Yehia M., Moore, Ronald J., Lee, Christine G., Pedersen, Catherine, Orwoll, Eric, Smith, Richard D., Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E., and Baker, Erin S. Sun . "Comparing identified and statistically significant lipids and polar metabolites in 15-year old serum and dried blood spot samples for longitudinal studies: Comparing lipids and metabolites in serum and DBS samples". United States. doi:10.1002/rcm.7808.
@article{osti_1399180,
title = {Comparing identified and statistically significant lipids and polar metabolites in 15-year old serum and dried blood spot samples for longitudinal studies: Comparing lipids and metabolites in serum and DBS samples},
author = {Kyle, Jennifer E. and Casey, Cameron P. and Stratton, Kelly G. and Zink, Erika M. and Kim, Young-Mo and Zheng, Xueyun and Monroe, Matthew E. and Weitz, Karl K. and Bloodsworth, Kent J. and Orton, Daniel J. and Ibrahim, Yehia M. and Moore, Ronald J. and Lee, Christine G. and Pedersen, Catherine and Orwoll, Eric and Smith, Richard D. and Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E. and Baker, Erin S.},
abstractNote = {The use of dried blood spots (DBS) has many advantages over traditional plasma and serum samples such as smaller blood volume required, storage at room temperature, and ability for sampling in remote locations. However, understanding the robustness of different analytes in DBS samples is essential, especially in older samples collected for longitudinal studies. Here we analyzed DBS samples collected in 2000-2001 and stored at room temperature and compared them to matched serum samples stored at -80°C to determine if they could be effectively used as specific time points in a longitudinal study following metabolic disease. Four hundred small molecules were identified in both the serum and DBS samples using gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), liquid chromatography-MS (LC-MS) and LC-ion mobility spectrometry-MS (LC-IMS-MS). The identified polar metabolites overlapped well between the sample types, though only one statistically significant polar metabolite in a case-control study was conserved, indicating degradation occurs in the DBS samples affecting quantitation. Differences in the lipid identifications indicated that some oxidation occurs in the DBS samples. However, thirty-six statistically significant lipids correlated in both sample types indicating that lipid quantitation was more stable across the sample types.},
doi = {10.1002/rcm.7808},
journal = {Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry},
number = 5,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Feb 05 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Feb 05 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • We developed a radioimmunoassay with a gamma-emitting radioligand to measure androstenedione in human serum and in dried blood-spot samples from newborns. Antisera were raised in rabbits against androstenedione linked to bovine serum albumin at positions 3, 6, or 11 on the steroid nucleus. Radioligands were prepared by linking ({sup 125}I)iodohistamine at positions 3, 6, or 11. Linkages were through either carboxymethyloxime or hemisuccinate bridges. All label and antibody combinations were examined, and the most sensitive and specific combination (antiserum raised against androstenedione-3-carboxymethyloxime-bovine serum albumin with an androstenedione-carboxymethyloxime-({sup 125}I)iodohistamine label) was selected for full evaluation. We report the performance of thesemore » selected reagents in an immunoassay for androstenedione in both serum and dried blood-spot samples from neonates. We measured concentrations of androstenedione in serum under normal and pathological conditions such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia and polycystic ovarian disease. Diurnal variation in normal men was observed. Androstenedione was measured in blood spots from neonates born at term or prematurely, with respiratory distress syndrome, or with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.« less
  • A study was made of influences of whole-body irradiation on the quartitative variation in serum of rabbits. The rate of increase or decrease in total lipid always paralleled that of total fatty acid. I the surviving groups receiving doses of l000 and 500 r, total lipid and fatty acid increased for 36 hr after irradiation and then gradually decreased. In the group receiving a single dose of l000 r, the rate of increase was twice the control 36 hr after irradiation. When the same doses of total-body irradiation were repeatedly given, the rate of increase was 2.5 times the control.more » In the group receiving a single dose of 500 r, the rate of increase was 1.5 times the control. When the same doses were repeated, the rate of increase was twice the control. I the group which remained alive less than 30 days, the total lipid and fatty acid increased quantitatively for 36 hr after irradiation with 1000 r, followed by a slight decrease, but rose again from the third day and persisted up to death. At this time the amount was three times as much as normal. The total cholesterol decreased slightly for the first 36 hr after irradiation, but there were no significant changes. However, in the group that lived less than 30 days after irradiation with 1000 r, the total cholesterol increased for 3 days after irradiation and reached about two times the control when animals died. ln the group treated with 1000 and 500 r, the total phospholipid reached the minimum about 12 hr after irradiation and returned to normal 24 hr after irradiation, but a decrease reappeared from the third day showing no recovery to normal. The group treated with 300 r showed no significant changes in various lipids. I the fasting test, no significant changes in various lipids were observed. It was found that the quantitative variation of various lipids in serum after irradiation was not due to humger. (auth)« less
  • Blood lead (Pb-b) concentrations, hematocrit (Ht), and hemoglobin (Hb) were determined in three groups of men working in different parts of a cable-producing factory. All three parameters examined, i.e., Pb-b, Ht, and Hb, in the above groups were found to be within normal limits. However, within each group of men studied, there was a statistically significant negative correlations between Pb-b concentrations and Ht and Hb values. This finding indicates that any increase in Pb-b concentration, even within the normal values, may result in a decrease of hematocrit and hemoglobin values of the same subjects.
  • Methylthio metabolites of polychlorobiphenyls (MeS-PCBs) were identified in dated sediment samples from two lakes in Switzerland by using high-resolution gas chromatography (HRGC) and negative ion chemical ionization mass spectroscopy (NICI-MS). MeS-PCBs and concomitant PCBs were found in all samples since the 1940s. This onset is earlier than that of other chlorinated pollutants including polychlorinated dioxins and furans and consistent with the first use of PCBs in the 1930s. The results indicate early environmental contamination from these important industrial chemicals. Complex mixtures of MeS-PCBs with various tri- to heptachlorinated congeners were observed. Total concentrations of MeS-PCBs were estimated to be asmore » high as 1-5 ppb (dry weight basis) or up to 2% relative to the concentration of PCBs. MeS-PCBs interfere in PCDD analyses and mimic the presence of certain PCDDs in environmental samples. 25 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.« less
  • Motor neuron disease is a devastating neurodegenerative condition, with the majority of sporadic, non-familial cases being of unknown etiology. Several epidemiological studies have suggested that occupational exposure to chemicals may be associated with disease pathogenesis. We report the case of a patient developing progressive motor neuron disease, who was chronically exposed to pesticides and organic solvents. The patient presented with leg spasticity and developed gradually clinical signs suggestive of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which was supported by the neurophysiologic and radiological findings. Our report is an evidence based case of combined exposure to organochlorine (DDTs), organophosphate pesticides (OPs) and organic solventsmore » as confirmed by laboratory analysis in samples of blood and hair confirming systematic exposure. The concentration of non-specific dialkylphosphates metabolites (DAPs) of OPs in hair (dimethyphopshate (DMP) 1289.4 pg/mg and diethylphosphate (DEP) 709.4 pg/mg) and of DDTs (opDDE 484.0 pg/mg, ppDDE 526.6 pg/mg, opDDD 448.4 pg/mg, ppDDD + opDDT 259.9 pg/mg and ppDDT 573.7 pg/mg) were considerably significant. Toluene and n-hexane were also detected in blood on admission at hospital and quantified (1.23 and 0.87 {mu}g/l, respectively), while 3 months after hospitalization blood testing was found negative for toluene and n-hexane and hair analysis was provided decrease levels of HCHs, DDTs and DAPs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Exposure to pesticides and organic solvents might be a risk factor for sporadic MND. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We report a patient who developed progressive upper and lower motor neuron disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The patient had a history of occupational exposure to pesticides and solvents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High DDTs' levels and increased levels of DMP and DEP were measured in his hair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The patients' exposure to chemicals might have played a role in MND development.« less