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Title: High-Modulus Low-Cost Carbon Fibers from Polyethylene Enabled by Boron Catalyzed Graphitization

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [1]
  1. Core Research and Development, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland MI 46667 USA
  2. DND-CAT Synchrotron Research Center, Northwestern University, APS/ANL 432-A004, 9700 S. Cass Avenue Argonne IL 60439 USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
OTHER U.S. STATES
OSTI Identifier:
1399135
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Small; Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 36
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Barton, Bryan E., Behr, Michael J., Patton, Jasson T., Hukkanen, Eric J., Landes, Brian G., Wang, Weijun, Horstman, Nicholas, Rix, James E., Keane, Denis, Weigand, Steven, Spalding, Mark, and Derstine, Chris. High-Modulus Low-Cost Carbon Fibers from Polyethylene Enabled by Boron Catalyzed Graphitization. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/smll.201701926.
Barton, Bryan E., Behr, Michael J., Patton, Jasson T., Hukkanen, Eric J., Landes, Brian G., Wang, Weijun, Horstman, Nicholas, Rix, James E., Keane, Denis, Weigand, Steven, Spalding, Mark, & Derstine, Chris. High-Modulus Low-Cost Carbon Fibers from Polyethylene Enabled by Boron Catalyzed Graphitization. United States. doi:10.1002/smll.201701926.
Barton, Bryan E., Behr, Michael J., Patton, Jasson T., Hukkanen, Eric J., Landes, Brian G., Wang, Weijun, Horstman, Nicholas, Rix, James E., Keane, Denis, Weigand, Steven, Spalding, Mark, and Derstine, Chris. Mon . "High-Modulus Low-Cost Carbon Fibers from Polyethylene Enabled by Boron Catalyzed Graphitization". United States. doi:10.1002/smll.201701926.
@article{osti_1399135,
title = {High-Modulus Low-Cost Carbon Fibers from Polyethylene Enabled by Boron Catalyzed Graphitization},
author = {Barton, Bryan E. and Behr, Michael J. and Patton, Jasson T. and Hukkanen, Eric J. and Landes, Brian G. and Wang, Weijun and Horstman, Nicholas and Rix, James E. and Keane, Denis and Weigand, Steven and Spalding, Mark and Derstine, Chris},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/smll.201701926},
journal = {Small},
number = 36,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jul 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jul 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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