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Title: An in situ tribometer for measuring friction and wear of polymers in a high pressure hydrogen environment

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1398818
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1395381
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 9; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-10 08:33:48; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Duranty, Edward R., Roosendaal, Timothy J., Pitman, Stan G., Tucker, Joseph C., Owsley, Jr., Stanley L., Suter, Jonathan D., and Alvine, Kyle J. An in situ tribometer for measuring friction and wear of polymers in a high pressure hydrogen environment. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5001836.
Duranty, Edward R., Roosendaal, Timothy J., Pitman, Stan G., Tucker, Joseph C., Owsley, Jr., Stanley L., Suter, Jonathan D., & Alvine, Kyle J. An in situ tribometer for measuring friction and wear of polymers in a high pressure hydrogen environment. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5001836.
Duranty, Edward R., Roosendaal, Timothy J., Pitman, Stan G., Tucker, Joseph C., Owsley, Jr., Stanley L., Suter, Jonathan D., and Alvine, Kyle J. Thu . "An in situ tribometer for measuring friction and wear of polymers in a high pressure hydrogen environment". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5001836.
@article{osti_1398818,
title = {An in situ tribometer for measuring friction and wear of polymers in a high pressure hydrogen environment},
author = {Duranty, Edward R. and Roosendaal, Timothy J. and Pitman, Stan G. and Tucker, Joseph C. and Owsley, Jr., Stanley L. and Suter, Jonathan D. and Alvine, Kyle J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.5001836},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 9,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Sep 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1063/1.5001836

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  • Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex-situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in-situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials like Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in-situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments up to 5,000 psi. Modulusmore » data from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.« less
  • Degradation of material properties by high-pressure hydrogen is an important factor in determining the safety and reliability of materials used in high-pressure hydrogen storage and delivery. Hydrogen damage mechanisms have a time dependence that is linked to hydrogen outgassing after exposure to the hydrogen atmosphere that makes ex situ measurements of mechanical properties problematic. Designing in situ measurement instruments for high-pressure hydrogen is challenging due to known hydrogen incompatibility with many metals and standard high-power motor materials such as Nd. Here we detail the design and operation of a solenoid based in situ tensile tester under high-pressure hydrogen environments upmore » to 42 MPa (6000 psi). Modulus data from high-density polyethylene samples tested under high-pressure hydrogen at 35 MPa (5000 psi) are also reported as compared to baseline measurements taken in air.« less
  • Cited by 2
  • Corrosive wear of a high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA) was examined in 0.02 mol/L sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) solution at different polarized potentials and loads using a pin-on-disc wear device and a potentiostat. Morphologies of the wear tracks were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Hydrogen content in the surface or subsurface of wear tracks was determined using secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). Results showed the increased material removal with a negative of potential in the cathodically polarized range resulted from the synergistic effect of hydrogen-induced damage and mechanical wear from hydrogen evolution on the wear surface. Increases in wearmore » loss with potential in the anodically polarized range resulted from synergism between anodic dissolution and wear.« less