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Title: A unified variational eigen-erosion framework for interacting brittle fractures and compaction bands in fluid-infiltrating porous media

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1398810
Grant/Contract Number:
1557089
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 318; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-20 16:34:34; Journal ID: ISSN 0045-7825
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wang, Kun, and Sun, WaiChing. A unified variational eigen-erosion framework for interacting brittle fractures and compaction bands in fluid-infiltrating porous media. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cma.2017.01.017.
Wang, Kun, & Sun, WaiChing. A unified variational eigen-erosion framework for interacting brittle fractures and compaction bands in fluid-infiltrating porous media. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.cma.2017.01.017.
Wang, Kun, and Sun, WaiChing. 2017. "A unified variational eigen-erosion framework for interacting brittle fractures and compaction bands in fluid-infiltrating porous media". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.cma.2017.01.017.
@article{osti_1398810,
title = {A unified variational eigen-erosion framework for interacting brittle fractures and compaction bands in fluid-infiltrating porous media},
author = {Wang, Kun and Sun, WaiChing},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.cma.2017.01.017},
journal = {Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering},
number = C,
volume = 318,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.cma.2017.01.017

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  • The interplay between resident water already in the subsurface environment (``old water") and infiltrating water (``new water") is examined. A smoothed particle hydrodynamics technique is used to simulate the interplay between old water and new water in a porous medium, over a cycle of drainage of old water and infiltration of new water. The effect of varying the average pore size is investigated via the Bond number, and several parameters (maximal mixing amount, minimal average size of old water pockets, mixing value for which the number of old water pockets decreases, and amount of old water remaining in the systemmore » for long times) are found to be independent of the average pore size, while the rate of change is always higher for larger pores. In particular, a certain amount of old water remains in the system within stable water pockets even after new water infiltration reaches steady state, and comprises about 2\% of the total water at steady state.« less
  • The development of a framework to support smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of fluid flow and transport in porous media is described. The framework is built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) toolkit and supports SPH simulations using a variety of different SPH models and setup formats. The SPH simulation code is decomposed into independent components that represent self-contained units of functionality. Different physics models can be developed within the framework by re-implementing key components but no modification of other components is required. The model for defining components and developing abstract interfaces for them that support a high degree ofmore » modularity and minimal dependencies between components is discussed in detail.« less
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  • Compaction bands are thin, tabular zones of grain breakage and reduced porosity that are found in sandstones. These structures may form due to tectonic stresses or as a result of local stresses induced during production of fluids from wells, resulting in barriers to fluid (oil, gas, water) movement in sandstone reservoirs. To gain insight into the formation of compaction bands the authors have produced them in the laboratory. Acoustic emission locations were used to define and track the thickness of compaction bands throughout the stress history during axisymmetric compression experiments. Narrow zones of intense acoustic emission, demarcating the boundaries betweenmore » the uncompacted and compacted regions were found to develop. Unexpectedly, these boundaries moved at velocities related to the fractional porosity reduction across the boundary and to the imposed specimen compression stress. This appears to be a previously unrecognized, fundamental mode of deformation of a porous, granular material subjected to compressive loading with significant implications for the production of hydrocarbons.« less