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Title: Cathodoluminescence for the 21st century: Learning more from light

Abstract

Cathodoluminescence (CL) is the emission of light from a material in response to excitation by incident electrons. The technique has had significant impact in the characterization of semiconductors, minerals, ceramics, and many nanostructured materials. Since 2010, there have been a number of innovative developments that have revolutionized and expanded the information that can be gained from CL and broadened the areas of application. While the primary historical application of CL was for spatial mapping of luminescence variations (e.g., imaging dark line defects in semiconductor lasers or providing high resolution imaging of compositional variations in geological materials), new ways to collect and analyze the emitted light have expanded the science impact of CL, particularly at the intersection of materials science and nanotechnology. Current developments include (1) angular and polarized CL, (2) advances in time resolved CL, (3) far-field and near-field transport imaging that enable drift and diffusion information to be obtained through real space imaging, (4) increasing use of statistical analyses for the study of grain boundaries and interfaces, (5) 3D CL including tomography and combined work utilizing dual beam systems with CL, and (6) combined STEM/CL measurements that are reaching new levels of resolution and advancing single photon spectroscopy. Thismore » focused review will first summarize the fundamentals and then briefly describe the state-of-the-art in conventional CL imaging and spectroscopy. We also review these recent novel experimental approaches that enable added insight and information, providing a range of examples from nanophotonics, photovoltaics, plasmonics, and studies of individual defects and grain boundaries.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. DELMIC, Delft (Netherlands)
  2. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar Energy Technologies Office (EE-4S)
OSTI Identifier:
1398755
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1380054
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5K00-68617
Journal ID: ISSN 1931-9401
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Reviews
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1931-9401
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; cathodoluminescence; nanophotonics; transport

Citation Formats

Coenen, T., and Haegel, N. M. Cathodoluminescence for the 21st century: Learning more from light. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4985767.
Coenen, T., & Haegel, N. M. Cathodoluminescence for the 21st century: Learning more from light. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4985767.
Coenen, T., and Haegel, N. M. Fri . "Cathodoluminescence for the 21st century: Learning more from light". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4985767. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1398755.
@article{osti_1398755,
title = {Cathodoluminescence for the 21st century: Learning more from light},
author = {Coenen, T. and Haegel, N. M.},
abstractNote = {Cathodoluminescence (CL) is the emission of light from a material in response to excitation by incident electrons. The technique has had significant impact in the characterization of semiconductors, minerals, ceramics, and many nanostructured materials. Since 2010, there have been a number of innovative developments that have revolutionized and expanded the information that can be gained from CL and broadened the areas of application. While the primary historical application of CL was for spatial mapping of luminescence variations (e.g., imaging dark line defects in semiconductor lasers or providing high resolution imaging of compositional variations in geological materials), new ways to collect and analyze the emitted light have expanded the science impact of CL, particularly at the intersection of materials science and nanotechnology. Current developments include (1) angular and polarized CL, (2) advances in time resolved CL, (3) far-field and near-field transport imaging that enable drift and diffusion information to be obtained through real space imaging, (4) increasing use of statistical analyses for the study of grain boundaries and interfaces, (5) 3D CL including tomography and combined work utilizing dual beam systems with CL, and (6) combined STEM/CL measurements that are reaching new levels of resolution and advancing single photon spectroscopy. This focused review will first summarize the fundamentals and then briefly describe the state-of-the-art in conventional CL imaging and spectroscopy. We also review these recent novel experimental approaches that enable added insight and information, providing a range of examples from nanophotonics, photovoltaics, plasmonics, and studies of individual defects and grain boundaries.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4985767},
journal = {Applied Physics Reviews},
number = 3,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Sep 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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Cited by: 2 works
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