skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Occupant workstation level energy-use prediction in commercial buildings: Developing and assessing a new method to enable targeted energy efficiency programs

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1398587
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energy and Buildings
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 127; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-07 03:34:08; Journal ID: ISSN 0378-7788
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Khosrowpour, Ardalan, Gulbinas, Rimas, and Taylor, John E. Occupant workstation level energy-use prediction in commercial buildings: Developing and assessing a new method to enable targeted energy efficiency programs. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2016.05.071.
Khosrowpour, Ardalan, Gulbinas, Rimas, & Taylor, John E. Occupant workstation level energy-use prediction in commercial buildings: Developing and assessing a new method to enable targeted energy efficiency programs. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2016.05.071.
Khosrowpour, Ardalan, Gulbinas, Rimas, and Taylor, John E. 2016. "Occupant workstation level energy-use prediction in commercial buildings: Developing and assessing a new method to enable targeted energy efficiency programs". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.enbuild.2016.05.071.
@article{osti_1398587,
title = {Occupant workstation level energy-use prediction in commercial buildings: Developing and assessing a new method to enable targeted energy efficiency programs},
author = {Khosrowpour, Ardalan and Gulbinas, Rimas and Taylor, John E.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.enbuild.2016.05.071},
journal = {Energy and Buildings},
number = C,
volume = 127,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.enbuild.2016.05.071

Save / Share:
  • U.S. residential and commercial buildings currently use about 39 quadrillion Btu (quads) of energy per year and account for 0.6 gigatonnes (GT) of carbon emitted to the atmosphere (38% of U.S. total emissions of 1.6 GT and approximately 9% of the world fossil-fuel related anthropogenic emissions of 6.7 GT). U.S. government buildings-related energy efficiency research and implementation programs are expected to reduce energy consumption in buildings. This has value both in reducing carbon emissions that result in global warming and adapting the U.S. residential and commercial building stock to a potentially warmer world. Analyses conducted by the Intergovernmental Panel onmore » Climate Change (IPCC) show that the world’s climate could warm relative to 1990 by 0.4ºC to 1.2°C by the year 2030 and by 1.4°C to 5.8°C by the end of the 21st century. This paper shows that the effect of the regional projected warming on energy consumption in U.S. residential and commercial buildings is a net decrease ranging from about 5% in 2020 to as much as 20% in 2080, but with an increase of as much as 25% in space cooling. Buildings-related energy efficiency programs should reduce energy consumption in buildings by more than 2 quads in 2020, which would more than offset the growth in space cooling due to climate and growth in building stock combined, and would be worth between $28 and $33 billion.« less
  • This article evaluates the implementation of programs promoting energy efficiency in new residential and commercial construction. It is one of a series of program experience articles that seek to synthesize current information from both published and unpublished sources to help utilities, state regulatory commissions, and others to identify, design, manage, and evaluate demand-side programs. The investigation focused on nonmandatory programs that are designed to complement or in some cases substitute for mandatory energy efficiency requirements in local and state building codes. The following types of nonmandatory programs were evaluated: technology demonstrations, pilot demonstration programs, financial incentive programs (including rebates, conservationmore » rates, reduced hookup fees, reduced loan interest rates and loan-qualifying criteria, guaranteed savings, and tax credits), consumer information and marketing programs (including energy rating systems and energy awards), technical information programs (including professional guidelines, design tools, design assistance, and standards-related training, compliance, and quality control), and site and community planning. In addition to presenting findings for each program category; the authors provide general program conclusions applicable to most of the energy conservation programs reviewed in this article and suggest energy conservation program strategies for promoting energy-efficient construction in the residential and commercial sectors.« less
  • Behavioral issues influencing energy use in small commercial buildings are explored using in-depth personal interviews with small-business owners and managers at a shopping center. Lack of feedback on energy consumption, separation of managers from costs, low energy costs relative to gross sales, and other factors distinguish this sector from the residential sector and are important influences on energy use in small commercial buildings. It is argued that traditional energy efficiency programs designed for the residential sector, such as audits and special rates, may not be appropriate in the small commercial sector, and that energy efficiency programs for this sector shouldmore » recognize and exploit non-financial determinants of behavior, target decision makers, intervene at the time of retrofits and remodels, and improve user information using simple feedback methods.« less
  • While buildings smaller than 50,000 sq ft account for nearly half of the energy used in US commercial buildings, energy efficiency programs to-date have primarily focused on larger buildings. Interviews with stakeholders and a review of the literature indicate interest in energy efficiency from the small commercial building sector, provided solutions are simple and low-cost. An approach to deliver energy management to small commercial buildings via HVAC contractors and preliminary demonstration findings are presented. The energy management package (EMP) developed includes five technical elements: benchmarking and analysis of monthly energy use; analysis of interval electricity data (if available), a one-hourmore » onsite walkthrough, communication with the building owner, and checking of results. This data-driven approach tracks performance and identifies low-cost opportunities, using guidelines and worksheets for each element to streamline the delivery process and minimize the formal training required. This energy management approach is unique from, but often complementary to conventional quality maintenance or retrofit-focused programs targeting the small commercial segment. Because HVAC contractors already serve these clients, the transaction cost to market and deliver energy management services can be reduced to the order of hundreds of dollars per year. This business model, outlined briefly in this report, enables the offering to benefit the contractor and client even at the modest expected energy savings in small buildings. Results from a small-scale pilot of this approach validated that the EMP could be delivered by contractors in 4-8 hours per building per year, and that energy savings of 3-5percent are feasible through this approach.« less