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Title: Suitability of PCR primers for characterizing invertebrate communities from soil and leaf litter targeting metazoan 18S ribosomal or cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1398585
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0004335
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
European Journal of Soil Biology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 80; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-07 03:38:37; Journal ID: ISSN 1164-5563
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
France
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Horton, Dean J., Kershner, Mark W., and Blackwood, Christopher B. Suitability of PCR primers for characterizing invertebrate communities from soil and leaf litter targeting metazoan 18S ribosomal or cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes. France: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ejsobi.2017.04.003.
Horton, Dean J., Kershner, Mark W., & Blackwood, Christopher B. Suitability of PCR primers for characterizing invertebrate communities from soil and leaf litter targeting metazoan 18S ribosomal or cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes. France. doi:10.1016/j.ejsobi.2017.04.003.
Horton, Dean J., Kershner, Mark W., and Blackwood, Christopher B. Mon . "Suitability of PCR primers for characterizing invertebrate communities from soil and leaf litter targeting metazoan 18S ribosomal or cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes". France. doi:10.1016/j.ejsobi.2017.04.003.
@article{osti_1398585,
title = {Suitability of PCR primers for characterizing invertebrate communities from soil and leaf litter targeting metazoan 18S ribosomal or cytochrome oxidase I (COI) genes},
author = {Horton, Dean J. and Kershner, Mark W. and Blackwood, Christopher B.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ejsobi.2017.04.003},
journal = {European Journal of Soil Biology},
number = C,
volume = 80,
place = {France},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.ejsobi.2017.04.003

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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