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Title: Initial Hubble Diagram Results from the Nearby Supernova Factory

Abstract

The use of Type Ia supernovae as distance indicators led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe a decade ago. Now that large second generation surveys have significantly increased the size and quality of the high-redshift sample, the cosmological constraints are limited by the currently available sample of ~50 cosmologically useful nearby supernovae. The Nearby Supernova Factory addresses this problem by discovering nearby supernovae and observing their spectrophotometric time development. Our data sample includes over 2400 spectra from spectral timeseries of 185 supernovae. This talk presents results from a portion of this sample including a Hubble diagram (relative distance vs. redshift) and a description of some analyses using this rich dataset.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [2];  [4];  [4];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [5];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [5];  [1];  [2] more »;  [3];  [4];  [4];  [2];  [1] « less
  1. Lab. Nuclear and High-Energy Physics (LPNHE), Paris (France)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)
  4. Inst. of Nuclear Physics of Lyon (France)
  5. Center of Research Astrophysics of Lyon (CRAL) (France)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1398502
Report Number(s):
arXiv:0810.3499
ark:/13030/qt6d99n8ht
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; FG02-92ER40704; AST-0407297; FG02-06ER06-04; 0087344; 0426879
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 34th International Conference on High Energy Physics, Philadelphia, PA (United States), 01 Sep 2008
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS

Citation Formats

Bailey, S., Aldering, G., Antilogus, P., Aragon, C., Baltay, C., Bongard, S., Buton, C, Childress, M., Copin, Y., Gangler, E., Loken, S., Nugent, P., Pain, R., Pecontal, E., Pereira, R., Perlmutter, S., Rabinowitz, D., Rigaudier, G., Ripoche, P., Runge, K., Scalzo, R., Smadja, G., Tao, C., Thomas, R. C., and Wu, C. Initial Hubble Diagram Results from the Nearby Supernova Factory. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Bailey, S., Aldering, G., Antilogus, P., Aragon, C., Baltay, C., Bongard, S., Buton, C, Childress, M., Copin, Y., Gangler, E., Loken, S., Nugent, P., Pain, R., Pecontal, E., Pereira, R., Perlmutter, S., Rabinowitz, D., Rigaudier, G., Ripoche, P., Runge, K., Scalzo, R., Smadja, G., Tao, C., Thomas, R. C., & Wu, C. Initial Hubble Diagram Results from the Nearby Supernova Factory. United States.
Bailey, S., Aldering, G., Antilogus, P., Aragon, C., Baltay, C., Bongard, S., Buton, C, Childress, M., Copin, Y., Gangler, E., Loken, S., Nugent, P., Pain, R., Pecontal, E., Pereira, R., Perlmutter, S., Rabinowitz, D., Rigaudier, G., Ripoche, P., Runge, K., Scalzo, R., Smadja, G., Tao, C., Thomas, R. C., and Wu, C. 2017. "Initial Hubble Diagram Results from the Nearby Supernova Factory". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1398502,
title = {Initial Hubble Diagram Results from the Nearby Supernova Factory},
author = {Bailey, S. and Aldering, G. and Antilogus, P. and Aragon, C. and Baltay, C. and Bongard, S. and Buton, C and Childress, M. and Copin, Y. and Gangler, E. and Loken, S. and Nugent, P. and Pain, R. and Pecontal, E. and Pereira, R. and Perlmutter, S. and Rabinowitz, D. and Rigaudier, G. and Ripoche, P. and Runge, K. and Scalzo, R. and Smadja, G. and Tao, C. and Thomas, R. C. and Wu, C.},
abstractNote = {The use of Type Ia supernovae as distance indicators led to the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe a decade ago. Now that large second generation surveys have significantly increased the size and quality of the high-redshift sample, the cosmological constraints are limited by the currently available sample of ~50 cosmologically useful nearby supernovae. The Nearby Supernova Factory addresses this problem by discovering nearby supernovae and observing their spectrophotometric time development. Our data sample includes over 2400 spectra from spectral timeseries of 185 supernovae. This talk presents results from a portion of this sample including a Hubble diagram (relative distance vs. redshift) and a description of some analyses using this rich dataset.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Conference:
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  • We examine the relationship between Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) Hubble residuals and the properties of their host galaxies using a sample of 115 SNe Ia from the Nearby Supernova Factory. We use host galaxy stellar masses and specific star formation rates fitted from photometry for all hosts, as well as gas-phase metallicities for a subset of 69 star-forming (non-active galactic nucleus) hosts, to show that the SN Ia Hubble residuals correlate with each of these host properties. With these data we find new evidence for a correlation between SN Ia intrinsic color and host metallicity. When we combine ourmore » data with those of other published SN Ia surveys, we find the difference between mean SN Ia brightnesses in low- and high-mass hosts is 0.077 {+-} 0.014 mag. When viewed in narrow (0.2 dex) bins of host stellar mass, the data reveal apparent plateaus of Hubble residuals at high and low host masses with a rapid transition over a short mass range (9.8 {<=} log (M{sub *}/M{sub Sun }) {<=} 10.4). Although metallicity has been a favored interpretation for the origin of the Hubble residual trend with host mass, we illustrate how dust in star-forming galaxies and mean SN Ia progenitor age both evolve along the galaxy mass sequence, thereby presenting equally viable explanations for some or all of the observed SN Ia host bias.« less
  • The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an international experiment designed to lay the foundation for the next generation of cosmology experiments (such as CFHTLS, wP, SNAP and LSST) which will measure the expansion history of the Universe using Type Ia supernovae. The SNfactory will discover and obtain frequent lightcurve spectrophotometry covering 3200-10000 {angstrom} for roughly 300 Type Ia supernovae at the low-redshift end of the smooth Hubble flow. The quantity, quality, breadth of galactic environments, and homogeneous nature of the SNfactory dataset will make it the premier source of calibration for the Type Ia supernova width-brightness relation and the intrinsicmore » supernova colors used for K-correction and correction for extinction by host-galaxy dust. This dataset will also allow an extensive investigation of additional parameters which possibly influence the quality of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological probes. The SNfactory search capabilities and follow-up instrumentation include wide-field CCD imagers on two 1.2-m telescopes (via collaboration with the Near Earth Asteroid Tracking team at JPL and the QUEST team at Yale), and a two-channel integral-field-unit optical spectrograph/imager being fabricated for the University of Hawaii 2.2-m telescope. In addition to ground-based follow-up, UV spectra for a subsample of these supernovae will be obtained with HST. The pipeline to obtain, transfer via wireless and standard internet, and automatically process the search images is in operation. Software and hardware development is now underway to enable the execution of follow-up spectroscopy of supernova candidates at the Hawaii 2.2-m telescope via automated remote control of the telescope and the IFU spectrograph/imager.« less
  • The Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) is an international project to discover and study a large sample of type Ia supernovae in the redshift range 0.03 < z < 0.08. Follow-up spectro-photometric observations are performed using the dedicated Supernovae Integral-Field Spectrograph, mounted since 2004 on 2.2 m UH telescope. The goal is to acquire for each supernova and over its full life-time (more than 10 epochs) high spectro-photometric quality spectra over the extended optical range (320-1000 nm).I will present the current status of the SNfactory project, from search efficiency to first scientific results, with an emphasis on the spectro-photometric calibration issuesmore » and achievements.« less
  • The search for high-redshift Type Ia supernovae discovered, in its first years, a sample of seven supernovae. Using a ``batch`` search strategy, almost all were discovered before maximum light and were observed over the peak of their light curves. The spectra and light curves indicate that almost all were Type Ia supernovae at redshifts z = 0.35--0.5. These high-redshift supernovae can provide a distance indicator and ``standard clock`` to study the cosmological parameters q{sub 0}, {Lambda}, {Omega}{sub 0}, and H{sub 0}. These four presentations discuss observation strategies and rates, analysis and calibration issues, the sources of measurement uncertainty, and themore » cosmological implications, including bounds on q{sub 0}, of these first high-redshift supernovae from the ongoing search.« less
  • We present measurements of the Hubble diagram for 103 Type Ia supernovae (SNe) with redshifts 0.04 < z < 0.42, discovered during the first season (Fall 2005) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-II (SDSS-II) Supernova Survey. These data fill in the redshift 'desert' between low- and high-redshift SN Ia surveys. Within the framework of the MLCS2K2 light-curve fitting method, we use the SDSS-II SN sample to infer the mean reddening parameter for host galaxies, R{sub V} = 2.18 {+-} 0.14{sub stat} {+-} 0.48{sub syst}, and find that the intrinsic distribution of host-galaxy extinction is well fitted by an exponential function,more » P(A{sub V} ) = exp(-A{sub V} /{tau}{sub V}), with {tau}{sub V} = 0.334 {+-} 0.088 mag. We combine the SDSS-II measurements with new distance estimates for published SN data from the ESSENCE survey, the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS), the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and a compilation of Nearby SN Ia measurements. A new feature in our analysis is the use of detailed Monte Carlo simulations of all surveys to account for selection biases, including those from spectroscopic targeting. Combining the SN Hubble diagram with measurements of baryon acoustic oscillations from the SDSS Luminous Red Galaxy sample and with cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropy measurements from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, we estimate the cosmological parameters w and {omega}{sub M}, assuming a spatially flat cosmological model (FwCDM) with constant dark energy equation of state parameter, w. We also consider constraints upon {omega}{sub M} and {omega}{sub {lambda}} for a cosmological constant model ({lambda}CDM) with w = -1 and non-zero spatial curvature. For the FwCDM model and the combined sample of 288 SNe Ia, we find w = -0.76 {+-} 0.07(stat) {+-} 0.11(syst), {omega}{sub M} = 0.307 {+-} 0.019(stat) {+-} 0.023(syst) using MLCS2K2 and w = -0.96 {+-} 0.06(stat) {+-} 0.12(syst), {omega}{sub M} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016(stat) {+-} 0.025(syst) using the SALT-II fitter. We trace the discrepancy between these results to a difference in the rest-frame UV model combined with a different luminosity correction from color variations; these differences mostly affect the distance estimates for the SNLS and HST SNe. We present detailed discussions of systematic errors for both light-curve methods and find that they both show data-model discrepancies in rest-frame U band. For the SALT-II approach, we also see strong evidence for redshift-dependence of the color-luminosity parameter ({beta}). Restricting the analysis to the 136 SNe Ia in the Nearby+SDSS-II samples, we find much better agreement between the two analysis methods but with larger uncertainties: w = -0.92 {+-} 0.13(stat){sup +0.10} {sub -0.33}(syst) for MLCS2K2 and w = -0.92 {+-} 0.11(stat){sup +0.07} {sub -0.15} (syst) for SALT-II.« less