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Title: Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Uganda, Making Energy Efficiency Count. Executive Summary

Abstract

Like many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, Uganda has focused its energy sector investments largely on increasing energy access by increasing energy supply. The links between energy efficiency and energy access, the importance of energy efficiency in new energy supply, and the multiple benefits of energy efficiency for the level and quality of energy available, have been largely overlooked. Implementing energy efficiency in parallel with expanding both the electricity grid and new clean energy generation reduces electricity demand and helps optimize the power supply so that it can serve more customers reliably at minimum cost. Ensuring efficient appliances are incorporated into energy access efforts provides improved energy services to customers. Energy efficiency is an important contributor to access to modern energy. This Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Uganda (Roadmap) is a response to the important role that electrical energy efficiency can play in meeting Uganda’s energy goals. Power Africa and the United Nations Sustainable Energy for All (SEforALL) initiatives collaborated with more than 24 stakeholders in Uganda to develop this document. The document estimates that if the most efficient technologies on the market were adopted, 2,224 gigawatt hours could be saved in 2030 across all sectors, representing 31% of the projected load.more » This translates into 341 megawatts of peak demand reductions, energy access to an additional 6 million rural customers and reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by 10.6 million tonnes in 2030. The Roadmap also finds that 91% of this technical potential is cost-effective, and 47% is achievable under conservative assumptions. The Roadmap prioritizes recommendations for implementing energy efficiency and maximizing benefits to meet the goals and priorities established in Uganda’s 2015 SEforALL Action Agenda. One important step is to create and increase demand for efficiency through long-term enabling policies and financial incentives combined with development of technical expertise in the labor force to allow for the promotion of new business models, such as energy service companies. A combination of enabling policies, financial schemes, regulations, enforcement, and skill development are needed to open the energy efficiency market.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); Sustainable Energy for All; Uganda Ministry of Mineral Development; Power Africa
OSTI Identifier:
1398496
Report Number(s):
LBNL-2001016
ark:/13030/qt7wb7r4dr
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION

Citation Formats

de la Rue du Can, Stephane, Pudleiner, David, Jones, David, and Khan, Aleisha. Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Uganda, Making Energy Efficiency Count. Executive Summary. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1398496.
de la Rue du Can, Stephane, Pudleiner, David, Jones, David, & Khan, Aleisha. Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Uganda, Making Energy Efficiency Count. Executive Summary. United States. doi:10.2172/1398496.
de la Rue du Can, Stephane, Pudleiner, David, Jones, David, and Khan, Aleisha. Thu . "Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Uganda, Making Energy Efficiency Count. Executive Summary". United States. doi:10.2172/1398496. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1398496.
@article{osti_1398496,
title = {Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Uganda, Making Energy Efficiency Count. Executive Summary},
author = {de la Rue du Can, Stephane and Pudleiner, David and Jones, David and Khan, Aleisha},
abstractNote = {Like many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, Uganda has focused its energy sector investments largely on increasing energy access by increasing energy supply. The links between energy efficiency and energy access, the importance of energy efficiency in new energy supply, and the multiple benefits of energy efficiency for the level and quality of energy available, have been largely overlooked. Implementing energy efficiency in parallel with expanding both the electricity grid and new clean energy generation reduces electricity demand and helps optimize the power supply so that it can serve more customers reliably at minimum cost. Ensuring efficient appliances are incorporated into energy access efforts provides improved energy services to customers. Energy efficiency is an important contributor to access to modern energy. This Energy Efficiency Roadmap for Uganda (Roadmap) is a response to the important role that electrical energy efficiency can play in meeting Uganda’s energy goals. Power Africa and the United Nations Sustainable Energy for All (SEforALL) initiatives collaborated with more than 24 stakeholders in Uganda to develop this document. The document estimates that if the most efficient technologies on the market were adopted, 2,224 gigawatt hours could be saved in 2030 across all sectors, representing 31% of the projected load. This translates into 341 megawatts of peak demand reductions, energy access to an additional 6 million rural customers and reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by 10.6 million tonnes in 2030. The Roadmap also finds that 91% of this technical potential is cost-effective, and 47% is achievable under conservative assumptions. The Roadmap prioritizes recommendations for implementing energy efficiency and maximizing benefits to meet the goals and priorities established in Uganda’s 2015 SEforALL Action Agenda. One important step is to create and increase demand for efficiency through long-term enabling policies and financial incentives combined with development of technical expertise in the labor force to allow for the promotion of new business models, such as energy service companies. A combination of enabling policies, financial schemes, regulations, enforcement, and skill development are needed to open the energy efficiency market.},
doi = {10.2172/1398496},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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