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Title: Synthesis and Characterization of Pt–Ag Alloy Nanocages with Enhanced Activity and Durability toward Oxygen Reduction

Abstract

Engineering the elemental composition of metal nanocrystals offers an effective strategy for the development of catalysts or electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity. Herein, we report the synthesis of Pt–Ag alloy nanocages with an outer edge length of 18 nm and a wall thickness of about 3 nm. Such nanocages with a composition of Pt 19Ag 81 could be readily prepared in one step through the galvanic replacement reaction between Ag nanocubes and a Pt(II) precursor. Here, after 10 000 cycles of potential cycling in the range of 0.60–1.0 V as in an accelerated durability test, the composition of the nanocages changed to Pt 56Ag 44, together with a specific activity of 1.23 mA cm –2 toward oxygen reduction, which was 3.3 times that of a state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.37 mA cm –2) prior to durability testing. Density functional theory calculations attributed the increased activity to the stabilization of the transition state for breaking the O–O bond in molecular oxygen. Even after 30 000 cycles of potential cycling, the mass activity of the nanocages only dropped from 0.64 to 0.33 A mg –1 Pt, which was still about two times that of the pristine Pt/C catalyst (0.19 A mg –1more » Pt).« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)
  3. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)
  4. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Contributing Org.:
Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory; the Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne National Laboratory; the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC); and the UW-Madison Center for High Throughput Computing (CHTC)
OSTI Identifier:
1398266
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-05ER15731
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; density functional theory; nanocage; oxygen reduction reaction; platinum-based catalyst; Pt−Ag alloy

Citation Formats

Yang, Xuan, Roling, Luke T., Vara, Madeline, Elnabawy, Ahmed O., Zhao, Ming, Hood, Zachary D., Bao, Shixiong, Mavrikakis, Manos, and Xia, Younan. Synthesis and Characterization of Pt–Ag Alloy Nanocages with Enhanced Activity and Durability toward Oxygen Reduction. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03395.
Yang, Xuan, Roling, Luke T., Vara, Madeline, Elnabawy, Ahmed O., Zhao, Ming, Hood, Zachary D., Bao, Shixiong, Mavrikakis, Manos, & Xia, Younan. Synthesis and Characterization of Pt–Ag Alloy Nanocages with Enhanced Activity and Durability toward Oxygen Reduction. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03395.
Yang, Xuan, Roling, Luke T., Vara, Madeline, Elnabawy, Ahmed O., Zhao, Ming, Hood, Zachary D., Bao, Shixiong, Mavrikakis, Manos, and Xia, Younan. Fri . "Synthesis and Characterization of Pt–Ag Alloy Nanocages with Enhanced Activity and Durability toward Oxygen Reduction". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03395. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1398266.
@article{osti_1398266,
title = {Synthesis and Characterization of Pt–Ag Alloy Nanocages with Enhanced Activity and Durability toward Oxygen Reduction},
author = {Yang, Xuan and Roling, Luke T. and Vara, Madeline and Elnabawy, Ahmed O. and Zhao, Ming and Hood, Zachary D. and Bao, Shixiong and Mavrikakis, Manos and Xia, Younan},
abstractNote = {Engineering the elemental composition of metal nanocrystals offers an effective strategy for the development of catalysts or electrocatalysts with greatly enhanced activity. Herein, we report the synthesis of Pt–Ag alloy nanocages with an outer edge length of 18 nm and a wall thickness of about 3 nm. Such nanocages with a composition of Pt19Ag81 could be readily prepared in one step through the galvanic replacement reaction between Ag nanocubes and a Pt(II) precursor. Here, after 10 000 cycles of potential cycling in the range of 0.60–1.0 V as in an accelerated durability test, the composition of the nanocages changed to Pt56Ag44, together with a specific activity of 1.23 mA cm–2 toward oxygen reduction, which was 3.3 times that of a state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.37 mA cm–2) prior to durability testing. Density functional theory calculations attributed the increased activity to the stabilization of the transition state for breaking the O–O bond in molecular oxygen. Even after 30 000 cycles of potential cycling, the mass activity of the nanocages only dropped from 0.64 to 0.33 A mg–1Pt, which was still about two times that of the pristine Pt/C catalyst (0.19 A mg–1Pt).},
doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b03395},
journal = {Nano Letters},
number = 10,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 23 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Sep 23 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
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Cited by: 21works
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  • We report a facile synthesis of Pt–Ag nanocages with walls thinner than 2 nm by depositing a few atomic layers of Pt as conformal shells on Ag nanocubes and then selectively removing the Ag templateviawet etching.
    Cited by 2
  • An effective strategy for reducing the Pt content while retaining the activity of a Pt-based catalyst is to deposit the Pt atoms as ultrathin skins of only a few atomic layers thick on nanoscale substrates made of another metal. During deposition, however, the Pt atoms often take an island growth mode because of a strong bonding between Pt atoms. Here we report a versatile route to the conformal deposition of Pt as uniform, ultrathin shells on Pd nanocubes in a solution phase. The introduction of the Pt precursor at a relatively slow rate and high temperature allowed the deposited Ptmore » atoms to spread across the entire surface of a Pd nanocube to generate a uniform shell. The thickness of the Pt shell could be controlled from one to six atomic layers by varying the amount of Pt precursor added into the system. Compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@P nL (n = 1-6) core-shell nanocubes showed enhancements in specific activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model (100) surfaces suggest that the enhancement in specific activity can be attributed to the weakening of OH binding through ligand and strain effects, which, in turn, increases the rate of OH hydrogenation. A volcano-type relationship between the ORR specific activity and the number of Pt atomic layers was derived, in good agreement with the experimental results. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate that the ORR specific activity was maximized for the catalysts based on Pd@Pt 2-3L nanocubes. Because of the reduction in Pt content used and the enhancement in specific activity, the Pd@Pt 1L nanocubes showed a Pt mass activity with almost three-fold enhancement relative to the Pt/C catalyst.« less
  • Here, an effective strategy for reducing the Pt content while retaining the activity of a Pt-based catalyst is to deposit the Pt atoms as ultrathin skins of only a few atomic layers thick on nanoscale substrates made of another metal. During deposition, however, the Pt atoms often take an island growth mode because of a strong bonding between Pt atoms. Here we report a versatile route to the conformal deposition of Pt as uniform, ultrathin shells on Pd nanocubes in a solution phase. The introduction of the Pt precursor at a relatively slow rate and high temperature allowed the depositedmore » Pt atoms to spread across the entire surface of a Pd nanocube to generate a uniform shell. The thickness of the Pt shell could be controlled from one to six atomic layers by varying the amount of Pt precursor added into the system. Compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@Pt nL (n = 1–6) core–shell nanocubes showed enhancements in specific activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model (100) surfaces suggest that the enhancement in specific activity can be attributed to the weakening of OH binding through ligand and strain effects, which, in turn, increases the rate of OH hydrogenation. A volcano-type relationship between the ORR specific activity and the number of Pt atomic layers was derived, in good agreement with the experimental results. Both theoretical and experimental studies indicate that the ORR specific activity was maximized for the catalysts based on Pd@Pt 2–3L nanocubes. Because of the reduction in Pt content used and the enhancement in specific activity, the Pd@Pt 1L nanocubes showed a Pt mass activity with almost three-fold enhancement relative to the Pt/C catalyst.« less
  • Here, we report a facile synthesis of multiply twinned Pd@Pt core shell concave decahedra by controlling the deposition of Pt on preformed Pd decahedral seeds. The Pt atoms are initially deposited on the vertices of a decahedral seed, followed by surface diffusion to other regions along the edges/ridges and then across the faces. Different from the coating of a Pd icosahedral seed, the Pt atoms prefer to stay at the vertices and edges/ridges of a decahedral seed even when the deposition is conducted at 200 degrees C, naturally generating a core shell structure covered by concave facets. The nonuniformity inmore » the Pt coating can be attributed to the presence of twin boundaries at the vertices, as well as the {100} facets and twin defects along the edges/ridges of a decahedron, effectively trapping the Pt adatoms at these high-energy sites. As compared to a commercial Pt/C catalyst, the Pd@Pt concave decahedra show substantial enhancement in both catalytic activity and durability toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). For the concave decahedra with 29.6% Pt by weight, their specific (1.66 mA/cm 2 pt) and mass (1.60 A/mg/ 2 pt) ORR activities are enhanced by 4.4 and 6.6 times relative to those of the Pt/C catalyst (0.36 mA/cm 2 pt and 0.32 A/mg pt, respectively). After 10 000 cycles of accelerated durability test, the concave decahedra still exhibit a mass activity of 0.69 A/mg pt, more than twice that of the pristine Pt/C catalyst.« less