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Title: How is wood-based pellet production affecting forest conditions in the southeastern United States?

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1398144
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Forest Ecology and Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 396; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-05 15:50:19; Journal ID: ISSN 0378-1127
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Dale, Virginia H., Parish, Esther, Kline, Keith L., and Tobin, Emma. How is wood-based pellet production affecting forest conditions in the southeastern United States?. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2017.03.022.
Dale, Virginia H., Parish, Esther, Kline, Keith L., & Tobin, Emma. How is wood-based pellet production affecting forest conditions in the southeastern United States?. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2017.03.022.
Dale, Virginia H., Parish, Esther, Kline, Keith L., and Tobin, Emma. Sat . "How is wood-based pellet production affecting forest conditions in the southeastern United States?". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2017.03.022.
@article{osti_1398144,
title = {How is wood-based pellet production affecting forest conditions in the southeastern United States?},
author = {Dale, Virginia H. and Parish, Esther and Kline, Keith L. and Tobin, Emma},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.foreco.2017.03.022},
journal = {Forest Ecology and Management},
number = C,
volume = 396,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.foreco.2017.03.022

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “How is wood-based pellet production affecting forest conditions in the southeastern United States?” (Dale et al., 2017). This article describes how United States Forest Service (USFS) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data from multiple state inventories were aggregated and used to extract ten annual timberland variables for trend analysis in two case study bioenergy fuelshed areas. This dataset is made publically available to enable critical or extended analyses of changes in forest conditions, either for the fuelshed areas supplying the ports of Savannah, Georgia and Chesapeake, Virginia,more » or for other southeastern US forested areas contributing biomass to the export wood pellet industry.« less
  • The ongoing debate about costs and benefits of wood-pellet based bioenergy production in the southeastern United States (SE USA) requires an understanding of the science and context influencing market decisions associated with its sustainability. Production of pellets has garnered much attention as US exports have grown from negligible amounts in the early 2000s to 4.6 million metric tonnes in 2015. Currently, 98% of these pellet exports are shipped to Europe to displace coal in power plants. We ask, 'How is the production of wood pellets in the SE USA affecting forest systems and the ecosystem services they provide?' To addressmore » this question, we review current forest conditions and the status of the wood products industry, how pellet production affects ecosystem services and biodiversity, and what methods are in place to monitor changes and protect vulnerable systems. Scientific studies provide evidence that wood pellets in the SE USA are a fraction of total forestry operations and can be produced while maintaining or improving forest ecosystem services. Ecosystem services are protected by the requirement to utilize loggers trained to apply scientifically based best management practices in planning and implementing harvest for the export market. Bioenergy markets supplement incomes to private rural landholders and provide an incentive for forest management practices that simultaneously benefit water quality and wildlife and reduce risk of fire and insect outbreaks. Bioenergy also increases the value of forest land to landowners, thereby decreasing likelihood of conversion to nonforest uses. Monitoring and evaluation are essential to verify that regulations and good practices are achieving goals and to enable timely responses if problems arise. Conducting rigorous research to understand how conditions change in response to management choices requires baseline data, monitoring, and appropriate reference scenarios. Furthermore, long-term monitoring data on forest conditions should be publicly accessible and utilized to inform adaptive management.« less
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