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Title: Direct shear resistance models for simulating buried RC roof slabs under airblast-induced ground shock

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE), Power Systems Engineering Research and Development (R&D) (OE-10)
OSTI Identifier:
1398085
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Engineering Structures
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 140; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-05 09:01:17; Journal ID: ISSN 0141-0296
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Krauthammer, Theodor, and Astarlioglu, Serdar. Direct shear resistance models for simulating buried RC roof slabs under airblast-induced ground shock. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.engstruct.2017.02.056.
Krauthammer, Theodor, & Astarlioglu, Serdar. Direct shear resistance models for simulating buried RC roof slabs under airblast-induced ground shock. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.engstruct.2017.02.056.
Krauthammer, Theodor, and Astarlioglu, Serdar. Thu . "Direct shear resistance models for simulating buried RC roof slabs under airblast-induced ground shock". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.engstruct.2017.02.056.
@article{osti_1398085,
title = {Direct shear resistance models for simulating buried RC roof slabs under airblast-induced ground shock},
author = {Krauthammer, Theodor and Astarlioglu, Serdar},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.engstruct.2017.02.056},
journal = {Engineering Structures},
number = C,
volume = 140,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.engstruct.2017.02.056

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