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Title: Delayed tree mortality and Chinese tallow ( Triadica sebifera ) population explosion in a Louisiana bottomland hardwood forest following Hurricane Katrina

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1398025
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Forest Ecology and Management
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 378; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-05 03:10:16; Journal ID: ISSN 0378-1127
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Henkel, Theryn K., Chambers, Jeffrey Q., and Baker, David A. Delayed tree mortality and Chinese tallow ( Triadica sebifera ) population explosion in a Louisiana bottomland hardwood forest following Hurricane Katrina. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2016.07.036.
Henkel, Theryn K., Chambers, Jeffrey Q., & Baker, David A. Delayed tree mortality and Chinese tallow ( Triadica sebifera ) population explosion in a Louisiana bottomland hardwood forest following Hurricane Katrina. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2016.07.036.
Henkel, Theryn K., Chambers, Jeffrey Q., and Baker, David A. 2016. "Delayed tree mortality and Chinese tallow ( Triadica sebifera ) population explosion in a Louisiana bottomland hardwood forest following Hurricane Katrina". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.foreco.2016.07.036.
@article{osti_1398025,
title = {Delayed tree mortality and Chinese tallow ( Triadica sebifera ) population explosion in a Louisiana bottomland hardwood forest following Hurricane Katrina},
author = {Henkel, Theryn K. and Chambers, Jeffrey Q. and Baker, David A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.foreco.2016.07.036},
journal = {Forest Ecology and Management},
number = C,
volume = 378,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.foreco.2016.07.036

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  • Horn, Scott, James L. Hanula, Michael D. Ulyshen, and John C. Kilgo. 2005. Abundance of green tree frogs and insects in artificial canopy gaps in a bottomland hardwood forest. Am. Midl. Nat. 153:321-326. Abstract: We found more green tree frogs (Hyla cinerea) in canopy gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopy gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat. Flies were the most commonly collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogsmore » were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.« less
  • ABSTRACT - We found more green tree frogs ( Hyla cinerea) n canopv gaps than in closed canopy forest. Of the 331 green tree frogs observed, 88% were in canopv gaps. Likewise, higher numbers and biomasses of insects were captured in the open gap habitat Flies were the most commonlv collected insect group accounting for 54% of the total capture. These data suggest that one reason green tree frogs were more abundant in canopy gaps was the increased availability of prey and that small canopy gaps provide early successional habitats that are beneficial to green tree frog populations.
  • Examination of the effects on white-tail deer browsing and canopy opening size on relative abundance and diversity of woody and herbaceous regeneration in various sized forest openings in a Southern bottomland hardwood forest over three growing seasons (1995-1997). Herbaceous richness, diversity or evenness did not differ among exclosure types in any year of the study. Overall browsing rates on both woody and herbaceous vegetation were low throughout all the three years of the study. Low browsing rates reflect seasonal changes in habitat use by deer. Other factors may have influenced the initial vegetative response more than herbivory or gap size.
  • The effect of forest disturbance on C cycling has become an issue, given concerns about escalating atmospheric C content. The authors examined the effects of harvest intensity on in situ and laboratory mineral soil respiration in an East Texas bottomland hardwood forest between 6 and 22 mo after harvesting. Treatments included a clearcut, a partial cut wherein approximately 58% of the basal area was removed, and an unharvested control. The soda-lime absorption technique was used for in situ respiration (CO{sub 2} efflux) and the wet alkali method (NaOH) was used for laboratory mineral soil respiration. Soil temperature and moisture contentmore » were also measured. Harvesting significantly increased in situ respiration during most sampling periods. This effect was attributed to an increase in live root and microflora activity associated with postharvesting revegetation. In situ respiration increased exponentially (Q{sub 10} relationship) as treatment soil temperatures increased, but followed a parabolic-type pattern through the range of soil moisture measured (mean range 10.4--31.5%). Mean rates of laboratory mineral soil respiration measured during the study were unaffected by cutting treatment for most sampling sessions. Overall, the mean rate of CO{sub 2} efflux in the clearcuts was significantly higher than that in the partial cuts, which in turn was significantly higher than that in the controls. Mass balance estimates indicate that these treatment differences will have little or no long-term effect on C sequestration of these managed forests.« less
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