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Title: Microbial Metagenomics Reveals Climate-Relevant Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1398007
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231; SC0004918; AC06-76RLO 1830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Trends in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: 8; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-05 03:15:18; Journal ID: ISSN 0966-842X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Long, Philip E., Williams, Kenneth H., Hubbard, Susan S., and Banfield, Jillian F.. Microbial Metagenomics Reveals Climate-Relevant Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2016.04.006.
Long, Philip E., Williams, Kenneth H., Hubbard, Susan S., & Banfield, Jillian F.. Microbial Metagenomics Reveals Climate-Relevant Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2016.04.006.
Long, Philip E., Williams, Kenneth H., Hubbard, Susan S., and Banfield, Jillian F.. 2016. "Microbial Metagenomics Reveals Climate-Relevant Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2016.04.006.
@article{osti_1398007,
title = {Microbial Metagenomics Reveals Climate-Relevant Subsurface Biogeochemical Processes},
author = {Long, Philip E. and Williams, Kenneth H. and Hubbard, Susan S. and Banfield, Jillian F.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.tim.2016.04.006},
journal = {Trends in Microbiology},
number = 8,
volume = 24,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.tim.2016.04.006

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