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Title: Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) — Principles, geometry and design process

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1397898
Grant/Contract Number:
NE0008455
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nuclear Engineering and Design
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 307; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 22:33:57; Journal ID: ISSN 0029-5493
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Qvist, Staffan A., Hellesen, Carl, Thiele, Roman, Dubberley, Allen E., Gradecka, Malwina, and Greenspan, Ehud. Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) — Principles, geometry and design process. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.nucengdes.2016.07.018.
Qvist, Staffan A., Hellesen, Carl, Thiele, Roman, Dubberley, Allen E., Gradecka, Malwina, & Greenspan, Ehud. Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) — Principles, geometry and design process. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.nucengdes.2016.07.018.
Qvist, Staffan A., Hellesen, Carl, Thiele, Roman, Dubberley, Allen E., Gradecka, Malwina, and Greenspan, Ehud. Sat . "Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) — Principles, geometry and design process". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.nucengdes.2016.07.018.
@article{osti_1397898,
title = {Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) — Principles, geometry and design process},
author = {Qvist, Staffan A. and Hellesen, Carl and Thiele, Roman and Dubberley, Allen E. and Gradecka, Malwina and Greenspan, Ehud},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.nucengdes.2016.07.018},
journal = {Nuclear Engineering and Design},
number = C,
volume = 307,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.nucengdes.2016.07.018

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • The Autonomous Reactivity Control (ARC) system was developed to ensure inherent safety of Generation IV reactors while having a minimal impact on reactor performance and economic viability. In this study we present the transient response of fast reactor cores to postulated accident scenarios with and without ARC systems installed. Using a combination of analytical methods and numerical simulation, the principles of ARC system design that assure stability and avoids oscillatory behavior have been identified. A comprehensive transient analysis study for ARC-equipped cores, including a series of Unprotected Loss of Flow (ULOF) and Unprotected Loss of Heat Sink (ULOHS) simulations, weremore » performed for Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) designs. With carefully designed ARC-systems installed in the fuel assemblies, the cores exhibit a smooth non-oscillatory transition to stabilization at acceptable temperatures following all postulated transients. To avoid oscillations in power and temperature, the reactivity introduced per degree of temperature change in the ARC system needs to be kept below a certain threshold the value of which is system dependent, the temperature span of actuation needs to be as large as possible.« less
  • This paper summarizes an effort in which real-time radiography was implemented for on-line arc welding process study and control. X-ray penetrating radiation was used for volume observation in the welding pool and the heat-affected zone during the weld process. The advantages of such a technique are online detection and monitoring of defect formation in the weld and capability to study metal fusion and filler metal/base metal interaction and metal transfer in the welding pool. This technique may also be used for postservice, real-time remote testing of weld quality.
  • In this paper a mathematical formulation is developed and computed results are presented describing the temperature profiles in gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) arcs and, hence, the net heat flux from the welding arc to the weld pool. The formulation consists of the statement of Maxwell's equations, coupled to the Navier-Stokes equations and the differential thermal energy balance equation. The theoretical predictions for the heat flux to the workpiece are in good agreement with experimental measurements-for long arcs. The results of this work provide a fundamental basis for predicting the behavior of arc welding systems from first principles.