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Title: Radiocesium in migratory aquatic game birds using contaminated U.S. Department of Energy reactor-cooling reservoirs: A long-term perspective

Authors:
; ; ; ; ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1397850
Grant/Contract Number:
FC09-07SR22506
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 171; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 22:14:28; Journal ID: ISSN 0265-931X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kennamer, Robert A., Oldenkamp, Ricki E., Leaphart, James C., King, Joshua D., Bryan, Jr., A. Lawrence, and Beasley, James C. Radiocesium in migratory aquatic game birds using contaminated U.S. Department of Energy reactor-cooling reservoirs: A long-term perspective. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2017.02.022.
Kennamer, Robert A., Oldenkamp, Ricki E., Leaphart, James C., King, Joshua D., Bryan, Jr., A. Lawrence, & Beasley, James C. Radiocesium in migratory aquatic game birds using contaminated U.S. Department of Energy reactor-cooling reservoirs: A long-term perspective. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2017.02.022.
Kennamer, Robert A., Oldenkamp, Ricki E., Leaphart, James C., King, Joshua D., Bryan, Jr., A. Lawrence, and Beasley, James C. Mon . "Radiocesium in migratory aquatic game birds using contaminated U.S. Department of Energy reactor-cooling reservoirs: A long-term perspective". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.jenvrad.2017.02.022.
@article{osti_1397850,
title = {Radiocesium in migratory aquatic game birds using contaminated U.S. Department of Energy reactor-cooling reservoirs: A long-term perspective},
author = {Kennamer, Robert A. and Oldenkamp, Ricki E. and Leaphart, James C. and King, Joshua D. and Bryan, Jr., A. Lawrence and Beasley, James C.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jenvrad.2017.02.022},
journal = {Journal of Environmental Radioactivity},
number = C,
volume = 171,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jenvrad.2017.02.022

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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