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Title: Comparing methods for partitioning a decade of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in a temperate forest

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1397524
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 226-227; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 21:33:38; Journal ID: ISSN 0168-1923
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sulman, Benjamin N., Roman, D. Tyler, Scanlon, Todd M., Wang, Lixin, and Novick, Kimberly A. Comparing methods for partitioning a decade of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in a temperate forest. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2016.06.002.
Sulman, Benjamin N., Roman, D. Tyler, Scanlon, Todd M., Wang, Lixin, & Novick, Kimberly A. Comparing methods for partitioning a decade of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in a temperate forest. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2016.06.002.
Sulman, Benjamin N., Roman, D. Tyler, Scanlon, Todd M., Wang, Lixin, and Novick, Kimberly A. 2016. "Comparing methods for partitioning a decade of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in a temperate forest". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2016.06.002.
@article{osti_1397524,
title = {Comparing methods for partitioning a decade of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in a temperate forest},
author = {Sulman, Benjamin N. and Roman, D. Tyler and Scanlon, Todd M. and Wang, Lixin and Novick, Kimberly A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.agrformet.2016.06.002},
journal = {Agricultural and Forest Meteorology},
number = C,
volume = 226-227,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.agrformet.2016.06.002

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  • The authors objective was to assess the effect of changes in rainfall amount and distribution on CO{sub 2} emissions and dissolved organic C (DOC) leaching. The authors manipulated soil moisture, using a roof constructed below the canopy of a 65-yr-old Norway spruce plantation [Picea abies (L.) Karst.] at Solling, Germany. They simulated two scenarios: a prolonged summer drought of 172 d followed by a rewetting period of 19 d and a shorter summer drought of 108 d followed by a rewetting period of 33 d. Soil CO{sub 2} emission, DOE, soil matrix potential, and soil temperature were monitored in situmore » for 2 yr. On an annual basis no significant influence of the droughts on DOC leaching rates below the rhizosphere was observed. Although not significantly, the droughts tended to reduce soil respiration. Rewetting increased CO{sub 2} emissions in the first 30 d by 48% in 1993 and 144% in 1994. The CO{sub 2} flush during rewetting was highest at high soil temperatures and strongly affected the annual soil respiration rate. The annual emission rate from the drought plot was not affected by the drought and rewetting treatments in 1993, but increased by 51% to 4813 kg C ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} in 1994. Their results suggest that reduction of rainfall or changes in rainfall distribution due to climate change will affect soil CO{sub 2} emissions and possibly C storage in temperate forest ecosystems.« less
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  • The authors measured CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and CH{sub 4} fluxes between soils and the atmosphere in ambient and N-addition plots at a productive black cherry-sugar maple forest in northwest Pennsylvania to examine the link between N-cycling and trace gas fluxes. Fluxes were estimated using in-situ chambers. Net annual N mineralization was 121.0 kg N ha{sup {minus}1}yr{sup {minus}1}, and net nitrification was 85.8 kg N ha{sup {minus}1}yr{sup {minus}1}, or 71% of net mineralization. Carbon dioxide efflux and CH{sub 4} uptake were among the highest rates reported for temperate deciduous forests. Emissions of N{sub 2}O were within the range of ratesmore » reported elsewhere, including locations with lower rates of N-cycling. A short-term study (May-Oct.) showed that N fertilization reduced both CO{sub 2} emissions and CH{sub 4} uptake. N{sub 2}O effluxes in fertilized plots were not different from control plots. The relatively high rate of soil respiration corresponded to a high rate of N-cycling; however, N{sub 2}O emissions were not necessarily result in large emissions of N{sub 2}O. Concurrent rapid rates of N-cycling and high rates of CH{sub 4} uptake did not support the hypothesis that N-cycling rates directly control CH{sub 4} uptake. Links between N-cycling and CH{sub 4} oxidation are complex; the influence of N-cycling on flux rates must consider not only the rate of cycling, but also the disposition of N-cycling products, and the factors that influence rates of N dynamics.« less