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Title: Play and learn: Serious games in breaking informational barriers in residential solar energy adoption in the United States

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1397485
Grant/Contract Number:
EE0006129
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energy Research and Social Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-12-26 19:43:46; Journal ID: ISSN 2214-6296
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Rai, Varun, and Beck, Ariane L. Play and learn: Serious games in breaking informational barriers in residential solar energy adoption in the United States. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.erss.2017.03.001.
Rai, Varun, & Beck, Ariane L. Play and learn: Serious games in breaking informational barriers in residential solar energy adoption in the United States. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.erss.2017.03.001.
Rai, Varun, and Beck, Ariane L. 2017. "Play and learn: Serious games in breaking informational barriers in residential solar energy adoption in the United States". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.erss.2017.03.001.
@article{osti_1397485,
title = {Play and learn: Serious games in breaking informational barriers in residential solar energy adoption in the United States},
author = {Rai, Varun and Beck, Ariane L.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.erss.2017.03.001},
journal = {Energy Research and Social Science},
number = C,
volume = 27,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on March 8, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • The solar photovoltaic (PV) installation industry comprises thousands of firms around the world who collectively installed nearly 200 million panels in 2015. Spatial analysis of the emerging industry has received considerable attention from the literature, especially on the demand side concerning peer effects and adopter clustering. However this research area does not include similarly sophisticated spatial analysis on the supply side of the installation industry. The lack of understanding of the spatial structure of the PV installation industry leaves PV market research to rely on jurisdictional lines, such as counties, to define geographic PV markets. We develop an approach thatmore » uses the spatial distribution of installers' activity to define geographic boundaries for PV markets. Our method is useful for PV market research and applicable in the contexts of other industries. We use our approach to demonstrate that the PV industry in the United States is spatially heterogeneous. Despite the emergence of some national-scale PV installers, installers are largely local and installer communities are unique from one region to the next. The social implications of the spatial heterogeneity of the emerging PV industry involve improving understanding of issues such as market power, industry consolidation, and how much choice potential adopters have.« less
  • The paper reviews the status of solar energy commercialization in the United States for residential domestic water- and space-heating systems. Utilizing tax claims submitted to the Internal Revenue Service and U.S. Department of Energy data, adoption patterns in each state are determined and analyzed. The analyses include comparison with forecasts of solar feasibility and with other state characteristics. The solar market was found to be well established, although less active than suggested by life-cycle cost advantages. The national installation rate for 1980 and 1981 averaged 31 per 10,000 single family dwelling units. Major regional variations exist with highest rates inmore » the West and the lowest in the central and southeast states. Adoption rates were found to be inversely related to the states' residential energy consumption levels and directly related to their petroleum dependency and insolation availability.« less
  • This paper reviews the status of solar energy commercialization in the United States for residential domestic water- and space-heating systems. Utilizing tax claims submitted to the Internal Revenue Service and US Department of Energy data, adoption patterns in each state are determined and analyzed. The analyses include comparison with forecasts of solar feasibility and with other state characteristics. The solar market was found to be well established, although less active than suggested by life-cycle cost advantages. The national installation rate for 1980 and 1981 averaged 31 per 10,000 single family dwelling units. Major regional variations exist with highst rates inmore » the West and the lowest in the central and southeast states. Adoption rates were found to be inversely related to the states' residential energy consumption levels and directly related to their petroleum dependency and insolation availability. 21 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.« less