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Title: Infrared measurement of the temperature at the tool–chip interface while machining Ti–6Al–4V

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1397468
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Processing Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 243; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 21:23:13; Journal ID: ISSN 0924-0136
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Switzerland
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Heigel, J. C., Whitenton, E., Lane, B., Donmez, M. A., Madhavan, V., and Moscoso-Kingsley, W.. Infrared measurement of the temperature at the tool–chip interface while machining Ti–6Al–4V. Switzerland: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2016.11.026.
Heigel, J. C., Whitenton, E., Lane, B., Donmez, M. A., Madhavan, V., & Moscoso-Kingsley, W.. Infrared measurement of the temperature at the tool–chip interface while machining Ti–6Al–4V. Switzerland. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2016.11.026.
Heigel, J. C., Whitenton, E., Lane, B., Donmez, M. A., Madhavan, V., and Moscoso-Kingsley, W.. 2017. "Infrared measurement of the temperature at the tool–chip interface while machining Ti–6Al–4V". Switzerland. doi:10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2016.11.026.
@article{osti_1397468,
title = {Infrared measurement of the temperature at the tool–chip interface while machining Ti–6Al–4V},
author = {Heigel, J. C. and Whitenton, E. and Lane, B. and Donmez, M. A. and Madhavan, V. and Moscoso-Kingsley, W.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2016.11.026},
journal = {Journal of Materials Processing Technology},
number = C,
volume = 243,
place = {Switzerland},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jmatprotec.2016.11.026

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