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Title: Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1397363
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Water Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 103; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 21:08:37; Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1354
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Delaire, Caroline, van Genuchten, Case M., Amrose, Susan E., and Gadgil, Ashok J.. Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates. United Kingdom: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.watres.2016.07.020.
Delaire, Caroline, van Genuchten, Case M., Amrose, Susan E., & Gadgil, Ashok J.. Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.watres.2016.07.020.
Delaire, Caroline, van Genuchten, Case M., Amrose, Susan E., and Gadgil, Ashok J.. Sat . "Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.watres.2016.07.020.
@article{osti_1397363,
title = {Bacteria attenuation by iron electrocoagulation governed by interactions between bacterial phosphate groups and Fe(III) precipitates},
author = {Delaire, Caroline and van Genuchten, Case M. and Amrose, Susan E. and Gadgil, Ashok J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.watres.2016.07.020},
journal = {Water Research},
number = C,
volume = 103,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Sat Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.watres.2016.07.020

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 5works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • A new iron phosphate (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Fe{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}[H{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}] has been synthesized hydrothermally at HF concentrations from 0.5 to 1.2 mL. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals its three-dimensional open-framework structure (monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n (No. 14), a=6.2614(13) A, b=9.844(2) A, c=14.271(3) A, {beta}=92.11(1){sup o}, V=879.0(3) A{sup 3}). This structure is built from isolated linear trimers of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra, which are linked by (PO{sub 4}) groups to form ten-membered-ring channels along [1 0 0]. This isolated, linear trimer of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra, [(FeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}], is new and adds to the diverse linkagesmore » of Fe polyhedra as secondary building units in iron phosphates. The trivalent iron at octahedral sites for the title compound has been confirmed by synchrotron Fe K-edge XANES spectra and magnetic measurements. Magnetic measurements also show that this compound exhibit a strong antiferromagnetic exchange below T{sub N}=17 K, consistent with superexchange interactions expected for the linear trimer of ferric octahedra with the Fe-F-Fe angle of 132.5{sup o}. -- Graphical abstract: The three-dimensional open-framework structure of (NH{sub 4}){sub 4}Fe{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2}[H{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}] is built from a novel isolated, linear (FeO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH){sub 2}F{sub 2} trimer of corner-sharing Fe(III) octahedra linked by PO{sub 4} tetrahedra. Display Omitted« less
  • Comparison of picosecond kinetic and spectroscopic data for Zn octaethylporphine and Fe(III)Cl octaethylporphine with that for Zn-Fe(III)Cl, a cofacial diporphyrin composed of a Zn porphyrin covalently bound to an Fe(III)Cl porphyrin with two chains of five atoms each, supports the assignment of a light-driven electron transfer (k>10/sup 11/s/sup -1/) within Zn-Fe(III)Cl to form (Zn+/.Fe(II)Cl. The kinetics (kapprox. = 10/sup 10/ s/sup -1/) and thermodynamics of the reverse electron transfer are compared to those of a similar electron transfer in bacterial photosynthesis, the reduction of an oxidized bacteriochlorophyll dimer, (BChl)/sub 2/+/., by Fe(II) cytochrome c.
  • Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates are the two major iron sources utilized as electron acceptors by dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB) in anoxic soils and sediments. Although there have been many studies of microbial Fe(III)-oxide and Fe(III)-phyllosilicate reduction with both natural and specimen materials, no controlled experimental information is available on the interaction between these two phases when both are available for microbial reduction. In this study, the model DIRB Geobacter sulfurreducens was used to examine the pathways of Fe(III) reduction in Fe(III)-oxide stripped subsurface sediment that was coated with different amounts of synthetic high surface area goethite. Cryogenic (12K) 57Fe Mössbauermore » spectroscopy was used to determine changes in the relative abundances of Fe(III)-oxide, Fe(III)-phyllosilicate, and phyllosilicate-associated Fe(II) (Fe(II)-phyllosilicate) in bioreduced samples. Analogous Mössbauer analyses were performed on samples from abiotic Fe(II) sorption experiments in which sediments were exposed to a quantity of exogenous soluble Fe(II) (FeCl22H2O) comparable to the amount of Fe(II) produced during microbial reduction. A Fe partitioning model was developed to analyze the fate of Fe(II) and assess the potential for abiotic Fe(II)-catalyzed reduction of Fe(III)-phyllosilicatesilicates. The microbial reduction experiments indicated that although reduction of Fe(III)-oxide accounted for virtually all of the observed bulk Fe(III) reduction activity, there was no significant abiotic electron transfer between oxide-derived Fe(II) and Fe(III)-phyllosilicatesilicates, with 26-87% of biogenic Fe(II) appearing as sorbed Fe(II) in the Fe(II)-phyllosilicate pool. In contrast, the abiotic Fe(II) sorption experiments showed that 41 and 24% of the added Fe(II) engaged in electron transfer to Fe(III)-phyllosilicate surfaces in synthetic goethite-coated and uncoated sediment. Differences in the rate of Fe(II) addition and system redox potential may account for the microbial and abiotic reaction systems. Our experiments provide new insight into pathways for Fe(III) reduction in mixed Fe(III)-oxide/Fe(III)-phyllosilicate assemblages, and provide key mechanistic insight for interpreting microbial reduction experiments and field data from complex natural soils and sediments.« less
  • Dissimilatory microbial reduction of solid-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-bearing phyllosilicates (Fe(III)-phyllosilicates) is an important process in anoxic soils, sediments, and subsurface materials. Although various studies have documented the relative extent of microbial reduction of single-phase Fe(III)-oxides and Fe(III)-phyllosilicates, detailed information is not available on interaction between these two processes in situations where both phases are available for microbial reduction. The goal of this research was to use the model dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium (DIRB) Geobacter sulfurreducens to study Fe(III)-oxide vs. Fe(III)-phyllosilicate reduction in a range of subsurface materials and Fe(III)-oxide stripped versions of the materials. Low temperature (12K) Mossbauer spectroscopy was usedmore » to infer changes in the relative abundances of Fe(III)-oxide, Fe(III)-phyllosilicate, and phyllosilicate-associated Fe(II) (Fe(II)-phyllosilicate). A Fe partitioning model was employed to analyze the fate of Fe(II) and assess the potential for abiotic Fe(II)-catalyzed reduction of Fe(III)-phyllosilicates. The results showed that in most cases Fe(III)- oxide utilization dominated (70-100 %) bulk Fe(III) reduction activity, and that electron transfer from oxide-derived Fe(II) played only a minor role (ca. 10-20 %) in Fe partitioning. In addition, the extent of Fe(III)-oxide reduction was positively correlated to surface area-normalized cation exchange capacity and the phyllosilicate-Fe(III)/total Fe(III) ratio, which suggests that the phyllosilicates in the natural sediments promoted Fe(III)-oxide reduction by binding of oxide-derived Fe(II), thereby enhancing Fe(III)-oxide reduction by reducing or delaying the inhibitory effect that Fe(II) accumulation on oxide and DIRB cell surfaces has on Fe(III)-oxide reduction. In general our results suggest that although Fe(III)-oxide reduction is likely to dominate bulk Fe(III) reduction in most subsurface sediments, Fe(II) binding by phyllosilicates is likely to play a key role in controlling the long-term kinetics of Fe(III)-oxide reduction.« less
  • The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system that contains methyl viologen as an internalised electron carrier has been used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally-located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, direct electron transfer from the interior through MtrCAB tomore » solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The observed rates of conduction through the protein complex were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed in whole cells, demonstrating that direct electron exchange between MtrCAB and Fe(III) oxides is efficient enough to support in-vivo, anaerobic, solid phase iron respiration.« less