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Title: Methods for recovering metals from electronic waste, and related systems

Abstract

A method of recovering metals from electronic waste comprises providing a powder comprising electronic waste in at least a first reactor and a second reactor and providing an electrolyte comprising at least ferric ions in an electrochemical cell in fluid communication with the first reactor and the second reactor. The method further includes contacting the powders within the first reactor and the second reactor with the electrolyte to dissolve at least one base metal from each reactor into the electrolyte and reduce at least some of the ferric ions to ferrous ions. The ferrous ions are oxidized at an anode of the electrochemical cell to regenerate the ferric ions. The powder within the second reactor comprises a higher weight percent of the at least one base metal than the powder in the first reactor. Additional methods of recovering metals from electronic waste are also described, as well as an apparatus of recovering metals from electronic waste.

Inventors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1397259
Patent Number(s):
9,777,346
Application Number:
14/845,101
Assignee:
Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC INL
DOE Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2015 Sep 03
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION

Citation Formats

Lister, Tedd E, Parkman, Jacob A, Diaz Aldana, Luis A, Clark, Gemma, Dufek, Eric J, and Keller, Philip. Methods for recovering metals from electronic waste, and related systems. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Lister, Tedd E, Parkman, Jacob A, Diaz Aldana, Luis A, Clark, Gemma, Dufek, Eric J, & Keller, Philip. Methods for recovering metals from electronic waste, and related systems. United States.
Lister, Tedd E, Parkman, Jacob A, Diaz Aldana, Luis A, Clark, Gemma, Dufek, Eric J, and Keller, Philip. 2017. "Methods for recovering metals from electronic waste, and related systems". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1397259.
@article{osti_1397259,
title = {Methods for recovering metals from electronic waste, and related systems},
author = {Lister, Tedd E and Parkman, Jacob A and Diaz Aldana, Luis A and Clark, Gemma and Dufek, Eric J and Keller, Philip},
abstractNote = {A method of recovering metals from electronic waste comprises providing a powder comprising electronic waste in at least a first reactor and a second reactor and providing an electrolyte comprising at least ferric ions in an electrochemical cell in fluid communication with the first reactor and the second reactor. The method further includes contacting the powders within the first reactor and the second reactor with the electrolyte to dissolve at least one base metal from each reactor into the electrolyte and reduce at least some of the ferric ions to ferrous ions. The ferrous ions are oxidized at an anode of the electrochemical cell to regenerate the ferric ions. The powder within the second reactor comprises a higher weight percent of the at least one base metal than the powder in the first reactor. Additional methods of recovering metals from electronic waste are also described, as well as an apparatus of recovering metals from electronic waste.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Patent:

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  • The invention relates to a process for separating waste material such as domestic refuse that has already been pretreated in order to eliminate the larger part of the paper, plastic film, food remnants and ferromagnetic materials and the particle size of which has been reduced to less than 70 mm through grinding. The waste material contains both glass and aluminium, in addition to other components. The ground waste material is separated by specific gravity in three hydrocyclones or hydrocyclone-batteries connected in series. In the first hydrocyclone, in which water is used as the separating medium, the lightest materials are separated.more » In the second hydrocyclone, a final heavy fraction is separated. In the third hydrocyclone, the intermediate fraction obtained in the second hydrocyclone is separated into a final fraction containing practically all the glass and a final fraction containing practically all the aluminum. In the second and third hydrocyclones a heavy suspension, of the same composition in both cyclones, is used as the separating medium.« less
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  • A method is described for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300--800 C to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000--1,550 C at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals suchmore » as tin and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification. 2 figs.« less
  • A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300.degree.-800.degree. C. to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000.degree.-1,550.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tinmore » and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.« less
  • A method for recovering metals from metals-containing wastes, and vitrifying the remainder of the wastes for disposal. Metals-containing wastes such as circuit boards, cathode ray tubes, vacuum tubes, transistors and so forth, are broken up and placed in a suitable container. The container is heated by microwaves to a first temperature in the range of approximately 300-800.degree. C. to combust organic materials in the waste, then heated further to a second temperature in the range of approximately 1,000-1,550.degree. C. at which temperature glass formers present in the waste will cause it to melt and vitrify. Low-melting-point metals such as tinmore » and aluminum can be recovered after organics combustion is substantially complete. Metals with higher melting points, such as gold, silver and copper, can be recovered from the solidified product or separated from the waste at their respective melting points. Network former-containing materials can be added at the start of the process to assist vitrification.« less