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Title: Micro-tomography based analysis of thermal conductivity, diffusivity and oxidation behavior of rigid and flexible fibrous insulators

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1397098
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 108; Journal Issue: PA; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 18:19:57; Journal ID: ISSN 0017-9310
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Panerai, Francesco, Ferguson, Joseph C., Lachaud, Jean, Martin, Alexandre, Gasch, Matthew J., and Mansour, Nagi N. Micro-tomography based analysis of thermal conductivity, diffusivity and oxidation behavior of rigid and flexible fibrous insulators. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2016.12.048.
Panerai, Francesco, Ferguson, Joseph C., Lachaud, Jean, Martin, Alexandre, Gasch, Matthew J., & Mansour, Nagi N. Micro-tomography based analysis of thermal conductivity, diffusivity and oxidation behavior of rigid and flexible fibrous insulators. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2016.12.048.
Panerai, Francesco, Ferguson, Joseph C., Lachaud, Jean, Martin, Alexandre, Gasch, Matthew J., and Mansour, Nagi N. Mon . "Micro-tomography based analysis of thermal conductivity, diffusivity and oxidation behavior of rigid and flexible fibrous insulators". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2016.12.048.
@article{osti_1397098,
title = {Micro-tomography based analysis of thermal conductivity, diffusivity and oxidation behavior of rigid and flexible fibrous insulators},
author = {Panerai, Francesco and Ferguson, Joseph C. and Lachaud, Jean and Martin, Alexandre and Gasch, Matthew J. and Mansour, Nagi N.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2016.12.048},
journal = {International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer},
number = PA,
volume = 108,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.ijheatmasstransfer.2016.12.048

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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