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Title: Laser welding of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays on polymer workpieces

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1396873
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Carbon
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 115; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 15:41:51; Journal ID: ISSN 0008-6223
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

In, Jung Bin, Kwon, Hyuk-Jun, Yoo, Jae-Hyuck, Allen, Frances I., Minor, Andrew M., and Grigoropoulos, Costas P.. Laser welding of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays on polymer workpieces. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.carbon.2017.01.050.
In, Jung Bin, Kwon, Hyuk-Jun, Yoo, Jae-Hyuck, Allen, Frances I., Minor, Andrew M., & Grigoropoulos, Costas P.. Laser welding of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays on polymer workpieces. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.carbon.2017.01.050.
In, Jung Bin, Kwon, Hyuk-Jun, Yoo, Jae-Hyuck, Allen, Frances I., Minor, Andrew M., and Grigoropoulos, Costas P.. 2017. "Laser welding of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays on polymer workpieces". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.carbon.2017.01.050.
@article{osti_1396873,
title = {Laser welding of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays on polymer workpieces},
author = {In, Jung Bin and Kwon, Hyuk-Jun and Yoo, Jae-Hyuck and Allen, Frances I. and Minor, Andrew M. and Grigoropoulos, Costas P.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.carbon.2017.01.050},
journal = {Carbon},
number = C,
volume = 115,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.carbon.2017.01.050

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • No abstract prepared.
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