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Title: A mechanistic model for depth-dependent hardness of ion irradiated metals

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1396868
Grant/Contract Number:
NE0000678; 11632001
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Nuclear Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 485; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 15:31:39; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3115
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Xiao, Xiazi, Chen, Qianying, Yang, Hui, Duan, Huiling, and Qu, Jianmin. A mechanistic model for depth-dependent hardness of ion irradiated metals. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.12.039.
Xiao, Xiazi, Chen, Qianying, Yang, Hui, Duan, Huiling, & Qu, Jianmin. A mechanistic model for depth-dependent hardness of ion irradiated metals. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.12.039.
Xiao, Xiazi, Chen, Qianying, Yang, Hui, Duan, Huiling, and Qu, Jianmin. Wed . "A mechanistic model for depth-dependent hardness of ion irradiated metals". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.12.039.
@article{osti_1396868,
title = {A mechanistic model for depth-dependent hardness of ion irradiated metals},
author = {Xiao, Xiazi and Chen, Qianying and Yang, Hui and Duan, Huiling and Qu, Jianmin},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.12.039},
journal = {Journal of Nuclear Materials},
number = C,
volume = 485,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jnucmat.2016.12.039

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 5works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Stoichiometric polycrystalline magnesium aluminate spinel has been irradiated at 25 and 650/degree/C with 2.4 MeV Mg/sup plus/ ions to a fluence of 1.4 /times/ 10/sup 21/ ions/m/sup 2/ (/approximately/35 dpa peak damage level). Microindentation hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurements were used to characterize the irradiation effects. The room-temperature hardness of spinel increased by about 5% after irradiation at both temperatures. There was no evidence for amorphization at either irradiation temperature. Interstitial-type dislocations loops lying on /l brace/110/r brace/ and /l brace/111/r brace/ planes with <110> Burgers vectors were observed at intermediate depthsmore » (/approximately/1 ..mu..m) along the ion range. The <110>/l brace/111/r brace/ loops are presumably formed from <110>/l brace/111/r brace/ loops as a result of a shear on the anion sublattice. Only about 0.05% of the calculated displacements were visible in the form of loops, which indicates that spinel has a high resistance to aggregate damage accumulation. The peak damage region contained a high density of dislocations tangles. There was no evidence for the formation of voids or vacancy loops. The specimen irradiated at 650/degree/C was denuded of dislocation loops within /approximately/1 ..mu..m of the surface. 25 refs., 16 figs., 5 tabs.« less
  • The effect of interstitial gas atoms on cavity formation in self-ion irradiated nickel specimens is studied utilizing a 700-kV accelerator to inject H/sup +/ or He/sup +/ ions into nickel foils. A tandem accelerator then irradiates the foils with 14-MeV nickel to produce displacement damage. Details of the irradiation facilities are presented. Sample preparation and analysis techniques are described. Preliminary results and plans for future experiments are described.
  • The author demonstrates that a combination of (a) competitive binding of transition-metal cations, hardness cations, and protons to transition-metal-binding sites on fish gills and (b) aqueous complexation of transition-metal cations by HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}} explains why the regression slopes of In(LC50) vs In(hardness) for five divalent transition metals (Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) are {approximately}1, where LC50 is the median lethal concentration. For these calculations, the author assumed the amount of the transition metal bound to the fish gill at 50% mortality is constant (i.e., independent of water quality). Although the slopes theoretically should varymore » between 0 and 2, a slope of {approximately}1 is expected at midrange hardness if alkalinity covaries with hardness--a common condition in most laboratory toxicity tests. But if alkalinity is held constant while hardness is varied, a slope of {approximately}0.5 is expected at midrange hardness. Although predictions of LC50s using regressions of In(LC50) vs In(hardness) might be acceptable for regulating discharges of transition metals to waters in the midrange of hardness, extrapolations beyond this range might drastically overpredict metal toxicity.« less