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Title: A constitutive mechanical model for gas hydrate bearing sediments incorporating inelastic mechanisms

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1396857
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0013889
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Computers and Geotechnics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 15:45:02; Journal ID: ISSN 0266-352X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Sánchez, Marcelo, Gai, Xuerui, and Santamarina, J. Carlos. A constitutive mechanical model for gas hydrate bearing sediments incorporating inelastic mechanisms. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.compgeo.2016.11.012.
Sánchez, Marcelo, Gai, Xuerui, & Santamarina, J. Carlos. A constitutive mechanical model for gas hydrate bearing sediments incorporating inelastic mechanisms. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.compgeo.2016.11.012.
Sánchez, Marcelo, Gai, Xuerui, and Santamarina, J. Carlos. Sat . "A constitutive mechanical model for gas hydrate bearing sediments incorporating inelastic mechanisms". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.compgeo.2016.11.012.
@article{osti_1396857,
title = {A constitutive mechanical model for gas hydrate bearing sediments incorporating inelastic mechanisms},
author = {Sánchez, Marcelo and Gai, Xuerui and Santamarina, J. Carlos},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.compgeo.2016.11.012},
journal = {Computers and Geotechnics},
number = C,
volume = 84,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.compgeo.2016.11.012

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Hydrates of natural gas exist in nature in the Arctic regions and underneath the sea floor. Worldwide reservoir estimates range as high as 10/sup 7/ trillion ft/sup 3/. Very little information is available about the physical properties of these deposits, thus making difficult their detection by remote geophysical surveys. Reviewed are experimental sonic and resistivity measurements on hydrates, hydrate-bearing sediment, and permafrost. Conclusions indicate that hydrate layers are characterized by anomalously high sonic velocities and resistivities, both of which are functions of the amount of liquid water associated with the hydrates in the rock matrix. An analogy between hydrate-bearing sedimentsmore » and permafrost is used to propose simple quantitative relationships between liquid water content and the electrical resistivities and sonic velocities of the deposits. Electrical and sonic well-logging data are used to substantiate the basic conclusions of this review. 18 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.« less
  • We present {sup 14}C data on sediment samples from cores of the upper 7 m of the sediment column overlying a major continental-rise gas hydrate field on the southern Carolina Rise and inner Blake Ridge offshore the southeastern United States. The data show that glacial-age sediments are underrepresented in the cores. The observation is consistent with a previously predicted association between sea-level lowstands and increased frequency of sea-floor slumping on continental margins containing gas hydrates. 26 refs., 3 figs.
  • Even a small fraction of fine particles can have a significant effect on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments and sediment stability. Experiments were conducted to investigate the role of fine particles on gas production using a soil chamber that allows for the application of an effective stress to the sediment. This chamber was instrumented to monitor shear-wave velocity, temperature, pressure, and volume change during CO{sub 2} hydrate formation and gas production. The instrumented chamber was placed inside the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Seafloor Process Simulator (SPS), which was used to control the fluid pressure and temperature. Experiments were conducted withmore » different sediment types and pressure-temperature histories. Fines migrated within the sediment in the direction of fluid flow. A vuggy structure formed in the sand; these small cavities or vuggs were precursors to the development of gas-driven fractures during depressurization under a constant effective stress boundary condition. We define the critical fines fraction as the clay-to-sand mass ratio when clays fill the pore space in the sand. Fines migration, clogging, vugs, and gas-driven fracture formation developed even when the fines content was significantly lower than the critical fines fraction. These results show the importance of fines in gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments, even when the fines content is relatively low.« less