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Title: Evaluation of phenotype stability and ecological risk of a genetically engineered alga in open pond production

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1396634
Grant/Contract Number:
EE0003373
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Algal Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 24; Journal Issue: PA; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 10:02:06; Journal ID: ISSN 2211-9264
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Szyjka, Shawn J., Mandal, Shovon, Schoepp, Nathan G., Tyler, Briana M., Yohn, Christopher B., Poon, Yan S., Villareal, Steven, Burkart, Michael D., Shurin, Jonathan B., and Mayfield, Stephen P.. Evaluation of phenotype stability and ecological risk of a genetically engineered alga in open pond production. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2017.04.006.
Szyjka, Shawn J., Mandal, Shovon, Schoepp, Nathan G., Tyler, Briana M., Yohn, Christopher B., Poon, Yan S., Villareal, Steven, Burkart, Michael D., Shurin, Jonathan B., & Mayfield, Stephen P.. Evaluation of phenotype stability and ecological risk of a genetically engineered alga in open pond production. United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2017.04.006.
Szyjka, Shawn J., Mandal, Shovon, Schoepp, Nathan G., Tyler, Briana M., Yohn, Christopher B., Poon, Yan S., Villareal, Steven, Burkart, Michael D., Shurin, Jonathan B., and Mayfield, Stephen P.. Thu . "Evaluation of phenotype stability and ecological risk of a genetically engineered alga in open pond production". United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2017.04.006.
@article{osti_1396634,
title = {Evaluation of phenotype stability and ecological risk of a genetically engineered alga in open pond production},
author = {Szyjka, Shawn J. and Mandal, Shovon and Schoepp, Nathan G. and Tyler, Briana M. and Yohn, Christopher B. and Poon, Yan S. and Villareal, Steven and Burkart, Michael D. and Shurin, Jonathan B. and Mayfield, Stephen P.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.algal.2017.04.006},
journal = {Algal Research},
number = PA,
volume = 24,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.algal.2017.04.006

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 4works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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