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Title: Characterization and design of the FutureGen 2.0 carbon storage site

Authors:
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Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1396567
Grant/Contract Number:
FE0001882
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 09:57:02; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Gilmore, Tyler, Bonneville, Alain, Sullivan, Charlotte, Kelley, Mark, Appriou, Delphine, Vermeul, Vince, White, Signe, Zhang, Fred, Bjornstad, Bruce, Cornet, Francois, Gerst, Jacqueline, Gupta, Neeraj, Hund, Gretchen, Horner, Jake, Last, George, Lanigan, Dave, Oostrom, Mart, McNeil, Caitlin, Moody, Mark, Rockhold, Mark, Elliott, Mike, Spane, Frank, Strickland, Chris, Swartz, Lucy, Thorne, Paul, Brown, Christopher, Hoffmann, Jeffrey, and Humphreys, Kenneth. Characterization and design of the FutureGen 2.0 carbon storage site. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.07.022.
Gilmore, Tyler, Bonneville, Alain, Sullivan, Charlotte, Kelley, Mark, Appriou, Delphine, Vermeul, Vince, White, Signe, Zhang, Fred, Bjornstad, Bruce, Cornet, Francois, Gerst, Jacqueline, Gupta, Neeraj, Hund, Gretchen, Horner, Jake, Last, George, Lanigan, Dave, Oostrom, Mart, McNeil, Caitlin, Moody, Mark, Rockhold, Mark, Elliott, Mike, Spane, Frank, Strickland, Chris, Swartz, Lucy, Thorne, Paul, Brown, Christopher, Hoffmann, Jeffrey, & Humphreys, Kenneth. Characterization and design of the FutureGen 2.0 carbon storage site. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.07.022.
Gilmore, Tyler, Bonneville, Alain, Sullivan, Charlotte, Kelley, Mark, Appriou, Delphine, Vermeul, Vince, White, Signe, Zhang, Fred, Bjornstad, Bruce, Cornet, Francois, Gerst, Jacqueline, Gupta, Neeraj, Hund, Gretchen, Horner, Jake, Last, George, Lanigan, Dave, Oostrom, Mart, McNeil, Caitlin, Moody, Mark, Rockhold, Mark, Elliott, Mike, Spane, Frank, Strickland, Chris, Swartz, Lucy, Thorne, Paul, Brown, Christopher, Hoffmann, Jeffrey, and Humphreys, Kenneth. 2016. "Characterization and design of the FutureGen 2.0 carbon storage site". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.07.022.
@article{osti_1396567,
title = {Characterization and design of the FutureGen 2.0 carbon storage site},
author = {Gilmore, Tyler and Bonneville, Alain and Sullivan, Charlotte and Kelley, Mark and Appriou, Delphine and Vermeul, Vince and White, Signe and Zhang, Fred and Bjornstad, Bruce and Cornet, Francois and Gerst, Jacqueline and Gupta, Neeraj and Hund, Gretchen and Horner, Jake and Last, George and Lanigan, Dave and Oostrom, Mart and McNeil, Caitlin and Moody, Mark and Rockhold, Mark and Elliott, Mike and Spane, Frank and Strickland, Chris and Swartz, Lucy and Thorne, Paul and Brown, Christopher and Hoffmann, Jeffrey and Humphreys, Kenneth},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.07.022},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
number = C,
volume = 53,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.ijggc.2016.07.022

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  • The objective of the FutureGen 2.0 Project was to demonstrate, at the commercial scale, the technical feasibility of implementing carbon capture and storage (CCS) in a deep saline formation in Illinois, USA. Over approximately 5 years, the FutureGen Alliance conducted a detailed site-selection process and identified a site for carbon sequestration storage in Morgan County, Illinois. The storage site was fully characterized, including the collection of seismic data and the drilling and characterization of a stratigraphic borehole. The characterization data provided critical input for developing a site-specific conceptual model and subsequent numerical modeling simulations. The modeling simulations, coupled with themore » upstream designs of the pipeline and power plant supported the development of a detailed 90 percent design that included the injection wells and associated control and monitoring infrastructure. Collectively, all these data were used by the FutureGen Alliance to develop the required documentation to support the applications for four underground injection control (UIC) permits (one for each proposed well). In August 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued four, first-of-their-kind, Class VI UIC permits for carbon sequestration in the United States to the FutureGen Alliance. The information and data generated under this project have been made publically available through reports and publications, including this journal and others.« less
  • FutureGen 2.0 site will be the first near-zero emission power plant with fully integrated long-term storage in a deep, non-potable saline aquifer in the United States. The proposed FutureGen 2.0 CO 2 storage site is located in northeast Morgan County, Illinois, U.S.A., forty-eight kilometres from the Meredosia Energy Center where a large-scale oxy-combustion demonstration will be conducted. The demonstration will involve > 90% carbon capture, which will produce more than one million metric tons (MMT) of CO 2 per year. The CO 2 will be compressed at the power plant and transported via pipeline to the storage site. To examinemore » CO 2 storage potential of the site, a 1,467m characterization well (FGA#1) was completed in December 2011. The target reservoir for CO 2 storage is the Mt. Simon Sandstone and Elmhurst Sandstone Member of the lower Eau Claire Formation for a combined thickness of 176 m. Confining beds of the overlying Lombard and Proviso Members (upper Eau Claire Formation) reach a thickness of 126 m. Characterization of the target injection zone and the overlying confining zone was based on wellbore data, cores, and geophysical logs, along with surface geophysical (2-D seismic profiles, magnetic and gravity), and structural data collected during the initial stage of the project . Based on this geological model, 3D simulations of CO 2 injection and redistribution were conducted using STOMP-CO 2, a multiphase flow and transport simulator. After this characterization stage, it appears that the injection site is a suitable geologic system for CO 2 sequestration and that the injection zone is sufficient to receive up to 33 MMT of CO 2 at a rate of 1.1 MMT/yr. GHGT-11 conference« less
  • The impact of temperature variations of injected CO 2 on the mechanical integrity of a reservoir is a problem rarely addressed in the design of a CO 2 storage site. The geomechanical simulation of the FutureGen 2.0 storage site presented here takes into account the complete modeling of heat exchange between the environment and CO 2 during its transport in the pipeline and injection well before reaching the reservoir, as well as its interaction with the reservoir host rock. An ad-hoc program was developed to model CO 2 transport from the power plant to the reservoir and an approach couplingmore » PNNL STOMP-CO 2 multiphase flow simulator and ABAQUS® has been developed for the reservoir model which is fully three-dimensional with four horizontal wells and variable layer thickness. The Mohr-Coulomb fracture criterion has been employed, where hydraulic fracture was predicted to occur at an integration point if the fluid pressure at the point exceeded the least compressive principal stress. Evaluation of the results shows that the fracture criterion has not been verified at any node and time step for the CO 2 temperature range predicted at the top of the injection zone.« less
  • Numerical simulations have been used for estimating CO2 injectivity, CO2 plume extent, pressure distribution, and Area of Review (AoR), and for the design of CO2 injection operations and monitoring network for the FutureGen project. The simulation results are affected by uncertainties associated with numerous input parameters, the conceptual model, initial and boundary conditions, and factors related to injection operations. Furthermore, the uncertainties in the simulation results also vary in space and time. The key need is to identify those uncertainties that critically impact the simulation results and quantify their impacts. We introduce an approach to determine the local sensitivity coefficientmore » (LSC), defined as the response of the output in percent, to rank the importance of model inputs on outputs. The uncertainty of an input with higher sensitivity has larger impacts on the output. The LSC is scalable by the error of an input parameter. The composite sensitivity of an output to a subset of inputs can be calculated by summing the individual LSC values. We propose a local sensitivity coefficient method and applied it to the FutureGen 2.0 Site in Morgan County, Illinois, USA, to investigate the sensitivity of input parameters and initial conditions. The conceptual model for the site consists of 31 layers, each of which has a unique set of input parameters. The sensitivity of 11 parameters for each layer and 7 inputs as initial conditions is then investigated. For CO2 injectivity and plume size, about half of the uncertainty is due to only 4 or 5 of the 348 inputs and 3/4 of the uncertainty is due to about 15 of the inputs. The initial conditions and the properties of the injection layer and its neighbour layers contribute to most of the sensitivity. Overall, the simulation outputs are very sensitive to only a small fraction of the inputs. However, the parameters that are important for controlling CO2 injectivity are not the same as those controlling the plume size. The three most sensitive inputs for injectivity were the horizontal permeability of Mt Simon 11 (the injection layer), the initial fracture-pressure gradient, and the residual aqueous saturation of Mt Simon 11, while those for the plume area were the initial salt concentration, the initial pressure, and the initial fracture-pressure gradient. The advantages of requiring only a single set of simulation results, scalability to the proper parameter errors, and easy calculation of the composite sensitivities make this approach very cost-effective for estimating AoR uncertainty and guiding cost-effective site characterization, injection well design, and monitoring network design for CO2 storage projects.« less