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Title: Geodetic imaging of thermal deformation in geothermal reservoirs - production, depletion and fault reactivation

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1396505
Grant/Contract Number:
EE0006761
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 338; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 09:21:41; Journal ID: ISSN 0377-0273
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Im, Kyungjae, Elsworth, Derek, Guglielmi, Yves, and Mattioli, Glen S. Geodetic imaging of thermal deformation in geothermal reservoirs - production, depletion and fault reactivation. Netherlands: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2017.03.021.
Im, Kyungjae, Elsworth, Derek, Guglielmi, Yves, & Mattioli, Glen S. Geodetic imaging of thermal deformation in geothermal reservoirs - production, depletion and fault reactivation. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2017.03.021.
Im, Kyungjae, Elsworth, Derek, Guglielmi, Yves, and Mattioli, Glen S. Mon . "Geodetic imaging of thermal deformation in geothermal reservoirs - production, depletion and fault reactivation". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2017.03.021.
@article{osti_1396505,
title = {Geodetic imaging of thermal deformation in geothermal reservoirs - production, depletion and fault reactivation},
author = {Im, Kyungjae and Elsworth, Derek and Guglielmi, Yves and Mattioli, Glen S.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2017.03.021},
journal = {Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research},
number = C,
volume = 338,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.jvolgeores.2017.03.021

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • Cited by 4
  • We have conducted numerical simulation studies to assess the potential for injection-induced fault reactivation and notable seismic events associated with shale-gas hydraulic fracturing operations. The modeling is generally tuned towards conditions usually encountered in the Marcellus shale play in the Northeastern US at an approximate depth of 1500 m (~;;4,500 feet). Our modeling simulations indicate that when faults are present, micro-seismic events are possible, the magnitude of which is somewhat larger than the one associated with micro-seismic events originating from regular hydraulic fracturing because of the larger surface area that is available for rupture. The results of our simulations indicatedmore » fault rupture lengths of about 10 to 20 m, which, in rare cases can extend to over 100 m, depending on the fault permeability, the in situ stress field, and the fault strength properties. In addition to a single event rupture length of 10 to 20 m, repeated events and aseismic slip amounted to a total rupture length of 50 m, along with a shear offset displacement of less than 0.01 m. This indicates that the possibility of hydraulically induced fractures at great depth (thousands of meters) causing activation of faults and creation of a new flow path that can reach shallow groundwater resources (or even the surface) is remote. The expected low permeability of faults in producible shale is clearly a limiting factor for the possible rupture length and seismic magnitude. In fact, for a fault that is initially nearly-impermeable, the only possibility of larger fault slip event would be opening by hydraulic fracturing; this would allow pressure to penetrate the matrix along the fault and to reduce the frictional strength over a sufficiently large fault surface patch. However, our simulation results show that if the fault is initially impermeable, hydraulic fracturing along the fault results in numerous small micro-seismic events along with the propagation, effectively preventing larger events from occurring. Nevertheless, care should be taken with continuous monitoring of induced seismicity during the entire injection process to detect any runaway fracturing along faults.« less
  • The interaction between mechanical deformation and fluid flow in fault zones gives rise to a host of coupled hydromechanical processes fundamental to fault instability, induced seismicity, and associated fluid migration. In this paper, we discuss these coupled processes in general and describe three modeling approaches that have been considered to analyze fluid flow and stress coupling in fault-instability processes. First, fault hydromechanical models were tested to investigate fault behavior using different mechanical modeling approaches, including slip interface and finite-thickness elements with isotropic or anisotropic elasto-plastic constitutive models. The results of this investigation showed that fault hydromechanical behavior can be appropriatelymore » represented with the least complex alternative, using a finite-thickness element and isotropic plasticity. We utilized this pragmatic approach coupled with a strain-permeability model to study hydromechanical effects on fault instability during deep underground injection of CO{sub 2}. We demonstrated how such a modeling approach can be applied to determine the likelihood of fault reactivation and to estimate the associated loss of CO{sub 2} from the injection zone. It is shown that shear-enhanced permeability initiated where the fault intersects the injection zone plays an important role in propagating fault instability and permeability enhancement through the overlying caprock.« less
  • Material balance calculations, often referred to as ''zerodimensional'' or ''lumped element'' reservoir evaluations, have been used extensively in petroleum and geothermal engineering. This paper presents a Havlena and Odehtype material balance depletion model for two-phase reservoirs incorporating adsorption phenomena. A straight line formed between groups of thermodynamic and adsorption properties of water and the cumulative production history provides the initial fluid in place and the size of the vapor-dominated ''steam cap.'' Adsorption phenomena were found to be the controlling mechanism in the depletion of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. A material balance for vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs, demonstrating the importance of adsorption phenomena,more » is presented also. A straight line provides the initial fluid in place.« less