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Title: Practical aspects of diffractive imaging using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1396446
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Ultramicroscopy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 169; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 09:16:26; Journal ID: ISSN 0304-3991
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chen, Z., Weyland, M., Ercius, P., Ciston, J., Zheng, C., Fuhrer, M. S., D'Alfonso, A. J., Allen, L. J., and Findlay, S. D. Practical aspects of diffractive imaging using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe. Netherlands: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2016.06.009.
Chen, Z., Weyland, M., Ercius, P., Ciston, J., Zheng, C., Fuhrer, M. S., D'Alfonso, A. J., Allen, L. J., & Findlay, S. D. Practical aspects of diffractive imaging using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe. Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2016.06.009.
Chen, Z., Weyland, M., Ercius, P., Ciston, J., Zheng, C., Fuhrer, M. S., D'Alfonso, A. J., Allen, L. J., and Findlay, S. D. 2016. "Practical aspects of diffractive imaging using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe". Netherlands. doi:10.1016/j.ultramic.2016.06.009.
@article{osti_1396446,
title = {Practical aspects of diffractive imaging using an atomic-scale coherent electron probe},
author = {Chen, Z. and Weyland, M. and Ercius, P. and Ciston, J. and Zheng, C. and Fuhrer, M. S. and D'Alfonso, A. J. and Allen, L. J. and Findlay, S. D.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.ultramic.2016.06.009},
journal = {Ultramicroscopy},
number = C,
volume = 169,
place = {Netherlands},
year = 2016,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.ultramic.2016.06.009

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