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Title: Treatment of a hypersaline brine, extracted from a potential CO 2 sequestration site, and an industrial wastewater by membrane distillation and forward osmosis

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1396382
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Chemical Engineering Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 325; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 16:32:38; Journal ID: ISSN 1385-8947
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
Switzerland
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Salih, Hafiz H., and Dastgheib, Seyed A. Treatment of a hypersaline brine, extracted from a potential CO 2 sequestration site, and an industrial wastewater by membrane distillation and forward osmosis. Switzerland: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.cej.2017.05.075.
Salih, Hafiz H., & Dastgheib, Seyed A. Treatment of a hypersaline brine, extracted from a potential CO 2 sequestration site, and an industrial wastewater by membrane distillation and forward osmosis. Switzerland. doi:10.1016/j.cej.2017.05.075.
Salih, Hafiz H., and Dastgheib, Seyed A. 2017. "Treatment of a hypersaline brine, extracted from a potential CO 2 sequestration site, and an industrial wastewater by membrane distillation and forward osmosis". Switzerland. doi:10.1016/j.cej.2017.05.075.
@article{osti_1396382,
title = {Treatment of a hypersaline brine, extracted from a potential CO 2 sequestration site, and an industrial wastewater by membrane distillation and forward osmosis},
author = {Salih, Hafiz H. and Dastgheib, Seyed A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.cej.2017.05.075},
journal = {Chemical Engineering Journal},
number = C,
volume = 325,
place = {Switzerland},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on May 19, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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