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Title: Understanding heterogeneity in Genesis diamond-like carbon film using SIMS analysis of implants

Abstract

An amorphous diamond-like carbon film deposited on silicon made at Sandia National Laboratory by pulsed laser deposition was one of several solar wind (SW) collectors used by the Genesis Mission (NASA Discovery Class Mission #5). The film was ~1 μm thick, amorphous, anhydrous, and had a high ratio of sp 3–sp 2 bonds (>50%). For 27 months of exposure to space at the first We passively irradiated lagrange point, the collectors, with SW (H fluence ~2 × 10 16 ions cm -2; He fluence ~8 × 10 14 ions cm -2). The radiation damage caused by the implanted H ions peaked at 12–14 nm below the surface of the film and that of He about 20–23 nm. To enable quantitative measurement of the SW fluences by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, minor isotopes of Mg ( 25Mg and 26Mg) were commercially implanted into flight-spare collectors at 75 keV and a fluence of 1 × 10 14 ions cm -2. Furthermore, the shapes of analytical depth profiles, the rate at which the profiles were sputtered by a given beam current, and the intensity of ion yields are used to characterize the structure of the material in small areas (~200 × 200 ±more » 50 μm). Data were consistent with the hypothesis that minor structural changes in the film were induced by SW exposure.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]; ORCiD logo [8]
  1. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Center for Meteorite Studies, School of Earth and Space Exploration
  2. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Geology and Planetary Sciences
  3. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). ISR-2
  4. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Earth and Space Exploration
  5. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Nanostructure and Semiconductor Physics
  6. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Molecular Science
  7. Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States). Electron Microscope Facility, Geisel School of Medicine
  8. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
1396142
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-27685
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-2461
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396; #NNX14AF26G
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 52; Journal Issue: 19; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-2461
Publisher:
Springer
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Planetary Sciences

Citation Formats

Jurewicz, Amy J. G., Burnett, Don S., Rieck, Karen D., Hervig, Richard, Friedmann, Tom A., Williams, Peter, Daghlian, Charles P., and Wiens, Roger. Understanding heterogeneity in Genesis diamond-like carbon film using SIMS analysis of implants. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/s10853-017-1267-3.
Jurewicz, Amy J. G., Burnett, Don S., Rieck, Karen D., Hervig, Richard, Friedmann, Tom A., Williams, Peter, Daghlian, Charles P., & Wiens, Roger. Understanding heterogeneity in Genesis diamond-like carbon film using SIMS analysis of implants. United States. doi:10.1007/s10853-017-1267-3.
Jurewicz, Amy J. G., Burnett, Don S., Rieck, Karen D., Hervig, Richard, Friedmann, Tom A., Williams, Peter, Daghlian, Charles P., and Wiens, Roger. Wed . "Understanding heterogeneity in Genesis diamond-like carbon film using SIMS analysis of implants". United States. doi:10.1007/s10853-017-1267-3. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1396142.
@article{osti_1396142,
title = {Understanding heterogeneity in Genesis diamond-like carbon film using SIMS analysis of implants},
author = {Jurewicz, Amy J. G. and Burnett, Don S. and Rieck, Karen D. and Hervig, Richard and Friedmann, Tom A. and Williams, Peter and Daghlian, Charles P. and Wiens, Roger},
abstractNote = {An amorphous diamond-like carbon film deposited on silicon made at Sandia National Laboratory by pulsed laser deposition was one of several solar wind (SW) collectors used by the Genesis Mission (NASA Discovery Class Mission #5). The film was ~1 μm thick, amorphous, anhydrous, and had a high ratio of sp3–sp2 bonds (>50%). For 27 months of exposure to space at the first We passively irradiated lagrange point, the collectors, with SW (H fluence ~2 × 1016 ions cm-2; He fluence ~8 × 1014 ions cm-2). The radiation damage caused by the implanted H ions peaked at 12–14 nm below the surface of the film and that of He about 20–23 nm. To enable quantitative measurement of the SW fluences by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, minor isotopes of Mg (25Mg and 26Mg) were commercially implanted into flight-spare collectors at 75 keV and a fluence of 1 × 1014 ions cm-2. Furthermore, the shapes of analytical depth profiles, the rate at which the profiles were sputtered by a given beam current, and the intensity of ion yields are used to characterize the structure of the material in small areas (~200 × 200 ± 50 μm). Data were consistent with the hypothesis that minor structural changes in the film were induced by SW exposure.},
doi = {10.1007/s10853-017-1267-3},
journal = {Journal of Materials Science},
number = 19,
volume = 52,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Jul 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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  • The distribution of solar-wind ions in Genesis mission collectors, as determined by depth profiling analysis, constrains the physics of ion solid interactions involving the solar wind. Thus, they provide an experimental basis for revealing ancient solar activities represented by solar-wind implants in natural samples. We measured the first depth profile of ⁴He in a collector; the shallow implantation (peaking at <20 nm) required us to use sputtered neutral mass spectrometry with post-photoionization by a strong field. The solar wind He fluence calculated using depth profiling is ~8.5 x 10¹⁴ cm⁻². The shape of the solar wind ⁴He depth profile ismore » consistent with TRIM simulations using the observed ⁴He velocity distribution during the Genesis mission. It is therefore likely that all solar-wind elements heavier than H are completely intact in this Genesis collector and, consequently, the solar particle energy distributions for each element can be calculated from their depth profiles. Ancient solar activities and space weathering of solar system objects could be quantitatively reproduced by solar particle implantation profiles.« less
  • Hard diamond-like carbon films were deposited on Si(100) substrates using a CH{sub 4} plasma created through electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating. The ECR plasma was excited by a Lisitano coil. These films could be deposited with a negative dc bias ({minus}200 V) or a rf-induced negative self-bias ({minus}100 V) on the substrates. The deposition rate of the film was about 2.3 A/s. The deposited films were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis.
  • An investigation of the solid-state microwave synthetic method was performed using AgInSe{sub 2} as a model system. Sample volume, irradiation time and grinding time of reactants were investigated in order to determine the effect that these variables have on the phase purity of the reaction product. In addition, the reaction mechanism was probed by carrying out irradiation experiments using the constituent elements and binary mixtures. AgInSe{sub 2} samples synthesized via solid-state microwave irradiation were compared to a sample that was synthesized via high-temperature solid-state synthesis in a furnace. Powder X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in themore » UV/vis/near IR region were used to characterize all reaction products.« less
  • In the present study, the rf plasma chemical vapor deposition technique is applied to directly deposit a diamond-like carbon (DLC) film onto a zinc sulfide (ZnS) substrate with excellent adhesion. Great attention is paid to the investigation of the correlation between the deposition process parameters and the structure and properties of DLC film, and of the optical spectrum characteristic of DLC films appropriate to protect IR window materials. The experimental results show that the refractive index, microhardness, and growth rate of DLC films increase with increasing dc bias voltage. The IR transmittance of the ZnS substrate with DLC film hasmore » been increased to some extent between 3 and 12 [mu]m.« less